Prayer For Stressful Situations

How to Instantly Calm Yourself in Stressful Situations

Prayer For Stressful Situations

“Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” ~Victor Frankl

There’s a big lie we tell ourselves during stressful times.

It keeps us feeling lost, afraid, and unloved, we’re being picked up and carried away helplessly by a storm.

Our heads can fill with scary images, words, and stories about the cause and who is to blame for our unwanted pain.

Sound familiar? If it does, you’re not alone. You’re normal. This is how humans biologically respond to stress.

So what’s the big lie?

The big lie is that we have no control over our stress response.Actually, we do. A lot of control.

I’ve struggled the hard way through my fair share of troubling times. I’ve experienced money and job issues, battled with health, and been pushed in challenging relationships.

But that’s not the worst part. The worst part is I grew up a highly sensitive person, who would internally react to almost anything that could be interpreted as negative.

Of the feelings above, I hopelessly sat at the “feel all of them” end of the scale.

That was until a particularly trying relationship caused me so much stress and anxiety that I became sick of my unconscious reactions, and vowed to do everything possible to stop it (or make it easier).

Through research and a lot of experimenting I created a practical way to calm myself down instantly anywhere, anytime, when a meditation cushion or reassuring book was reach.

The technique was so simple and powerful that it pulled me through a harrowing experience in that relationship, and has held me together in plenty of experiences since.

It’s easy to remember, has an instant effect on your mind body, and most importantly, is simple enough to be remembered and used when you’re going through the eye of your own stress storms.

How to Calm Yourself In Two Minutes

Take a moment right now to make yourself comfortable and try these four steps yourself:

1. Freeze yourself

Remember the game you played as a child when you suddenly stopped mid-motion, you were frozen in ice? Do that now. Halt your body parts, emotions, and thought processes. Think of yourself as a cartoon character that’s been hit with a stun gun. You can even make it a little dramatic if it helps.

2. Focus on your index finger

(Skip to this if you find the first step difficult). For twenty to sixty seconds, concentrate solely on the back of your index finger. Let your mind and body be consumed by it.

Bring it closer to you. Study the rivets, creases, and those tiny little fingerprint lines. If your situation is noisy, let the sounds around you merge into a single background buzz, and let it fade your attention.

3. Take a conscious breath

Let go of your focus and check back in with your body. Take a deep, conscious breath in, then let it go through your mouth, slowly and calmly, creating a wave of relaxation that starts in your chest and floats out through your being to the surface of your skin.

4. Look around consciously

As you re-integrate with your surroundings, scan the scene in front of you. Remain as indiscriminate as possible with what you focus on the way you would when waking up in the morning.

Take conscious note of the thoughts that are trying to push back into your head and observe them with an attitude of curiosity.

How do you feel?

You might now feel a little more in touch with your senses, distanced from previous thoughts, and connected with the present moment.

Most importantly, you’ll recognize that the root of your discomfort is your thoughts. Everything else, emotions, and physical discomfort, and pain, start there.

If you’re having difficulty slowing down the mind at the beginning, try this: If you meditate regularly, spend the last minute of your session focused on the same finger, in the same way. Doing this will associate (or anchor) the feelings of clarity, relaxation, and attachment with the action.

And if you don’t meditate, it’s a great time to start! It will help with your ability to cope with stressful situations generally, and dramatically improve the effects of this technique.

Why This Technique Works

Stress is a mental or physical tension, and both manifest from your relationship to the procession of thoughts in your head.

Mindfulness allows you to step the procession and watch it go past, without being carried down the fast-flowing river.

When we get pulled down a heavy stream, our emotions and bodies react as if the danger or pain contained in the thought is real, immediate, and must be dealt with now. That’s why we feel discomfort even when someone reminds us of a stressful situation we were trying to forget.

Reconnecting with the present reminds us that here is the only time there really is.

Focusing on your hands is an ancient Ayurvedic practice that helps to ground the soul and provide stability in the physical body.

Try It for Yourself

The most important reason this technique works is it gives you something back—control.

We may not be able to choose what happens to us in our lives, but as Viktor Frankl says, we can always choose our response.

Give it a go next time you feel yourself panicking (and be sure to let us know how you go in the comments below).

See a typo, an inaccuracy, or something offensive? Please contact us so we can fix it!

Источник: https://tinybuddha.com/blog/instantly-calm-stressful-situations/

5 Common British English Phrases for Stressful Situations

Prayer For Stressful Situations
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Here’s a question.

Who do you think is going to be better at communicating in English in an international situation:

Jerry, a guy from somewhere in Britain?

Or Karina, from somewhere in Russia?

The answer is: Karina.

Surprised?

Me too!

According to research1,2, British people are among the worst communicators in English!

That’s because, although they know more words and phrases in English, British people are terrible (statistically speaking) at the strategies that help communication.

These strategies include things saying something in a different way when the other person doesn’t understand.

Or checking with the other person that they’ve understood in the first place.

And Brits have one more habit that drives English learners crazy:

They don’t simplify their language when talking to people from other countries.

They often use idiomatic words and phrases — the same words and phrases that they use with their friends and family.

So what does this mean for you?

Well, when that strange British person at work is talking to you with those strange words and phrases, don’t panic!

If you don’t know the phrases, try to guess the meaning from context — that’s an important skill to have.

But it also helps to have some phrases in your pocket, right?

So here we are — 5 common British English phrases for stressful situations.

What does it mean?

This phrase basically means “lost touch with reality.”

How can I use it?

This phrase has quite a large range of meanings.

It can mean “completely crazy.”

if your neighbour’s started singing pop songs to the tune of Beethoven’s fifth symphony, wearing a flower pot on her head and painting massive pictures of cats on her wall.

Then, yeah — she’s crazy. She’s lost the plot.

Or we can use it when our boss starts asking us to do ridiculous and pointless things — a familiar situation, right?

when the boss sends out a memo telling all employees to sign their emails with “yours sincerely and most humbly and obediently.” Which is pretty random. You could say he’s lost the plot.

Summary

So there we have it — 5 common British English phrases for stressful situations.

Let’s recap:

Nice oneGood work! I’m impressed!
Throw a spanner in the worksTo ruin or cause problems to a plan
Don’t mess me aroundDon't cause problems for me (especially in an unfair way).
Lost the plotLost touch with reality
It does my head inIt annoys or confuses me.

If you missed it, don’t forget to check out last week’s British English words post.

Did you find this useful? Do you know any people (or monkeys) that might also benefit from this? Then BE AWESOME and click the “share” button below! Spread the knowledge!

Meanwhile, what are your favourite British English phrases? Did I miss any good ones? Let me know in the comments.

Are you an English teacher? I’d love to hear from you! Click here.

1. Mauranen, A. (2006). Signaling and preventing misunderstanding in English as lingua
franca communication. International journal of the sociology of language, 177. 123-
150.

2. Jenkins, J., Cogo, A., and Dewey, M. (2011). Review of developments in research into
English as a lingua franca. Language teaching, 44(3), 281-315.

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Источник: https://www.clarkandmiller.com/5-common-british-english-phrases-for-stressful-situations/

10 Common Stressful Situations & How to Deal With Them

Prayer For Stressful Situations

Stress is inevitable, but you must understand that stress is essential for survival. The “fight-or-flight” mechanism built into you, allows you to respond appropriately to danger.

It’s all part of a chemical reaction that occurs in the brain.

The problem is when there are too many stressors at one time or the body is constantly in an anxious state, it causes both physical and mental health problems.

Americans Are Stressed Out

In 2015, the American Psychological Association did a study on stress. On a scale of 1 to 10, they found that Americans are about a 5 when it comes to being stressed out. That number is significant because that means almost half of the population is in a constant state of stress.

This is, no doubt, why the use of antidepressants is up over 400% in the past two decades. Stress can kill. So, here are 10 of the most common stressful situations and how you can cope with the pressure that comes with them.

1. Death in the Family

There is nothing worse than losing your loved one. This is an emotionally devastating experience. Never suppress your feelings. You must learn to express your emotions appropriately. Avoiding your feelings can prolong the grieving process. You may feel anger and injustice or even question the meaning of life.

These things are normal. Mental Health America suggests that you don’t judge yourself or how you feel. Rather, you should surround yourself with people who are in the same situation or who has been through something this. Find someone to talk to that you can be open and honest with. Most of all, find creative outlets to occupy your time.

2. Losing Your Job

Losing your job may cause panic. If you have no savings or 401k to fall back on, then you may really be at a loss. This significant rejection can lead to depression, so it’s important that you process the loss and move on. You must find another way to make money.

According to Erica Cirino from Health Line, the longer you are unemployed the more psychological unease you will have. Just with a death, you will ly experience denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.

Start pounding the pavement looking for another job. You may want to consider career changes or going back to school too. Also, don’t be afraid to take a lesser paying gig until you find the one you want.

Some money is better than no money.

3. Moving

Moving is chaotic and a big cause for stress. Whether you lost your home or your job transfers you doesn’t matter. Relocating from one place to another brings about major challenges. The fact that you may be in a new house or city can be overwhelming.

If it is moving to a new town that bothers you, Dianne Schmidt from The Spruce suggests you make a list of all the exciting things to do in the city. Find something to look forward to after the dust from the move has settled.

4. Having Difficult Conversations

Confrontation is never fun nor is it easy. But remember honesty is always the best. Don’t beat around the bush, just put all your cards on the table. Ryan Howes Ph.D., from Psychology Today, suggests that you stick to the point, and you must back it up with evidence. If you are in the right, then you should take comfort in that.

Things may be messy for a while, but getting something that is eating you off your chest is better than letting it affect your health.

5. Being The Victim Of A Crime

Being the victim of a crime causes both physical and psychological trauma. You may have cuts, bruises, or broken arms and legs, but the real pain is internal. The outer damages will heal, but the mental pain will last a while. To get through this discomfort, take care of yourself. If you need to sleep, let yourself sleep.

Victims of Crime suggests you join a support group and find comfort in others. Re-establish your normal routine as soon as possible. If you recognize signs of PTSD or other mental disorders after the incident, get professional help.

6. Dealing With a Serious Illness or Injury

While the physical repercussions of the injury are usually apparent, the psychological ones are not so easy to spot. You may feel isolated, have the fear of re-injury, and deal with a low self of esteem. Find a way to stay connected with the sport while you heal. Even if you just become a spectator, it’s still giving you something to look forward to.

Talk to someone. The fear and loss you have experienced is great. Dealing with a new reality often takes some professional assistance.

7. Divorce

When you say, “I Do,” you think it will be forever. However, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are 2,400 divorces every day in America. Remember, the only thing worse than being single is being married to the wrong one.

Find some friends that are also single. Support groups are a good outlet, and you need to get back out in the dating world too. You can go out as friends, you don’t have to make it serious. The companionship is what you will miss most.

Don’t isolate yourself and allow the feelings of anguish take over. Force yourself to get the house and keep going.

If you’re going through a recent divorce, this video from lifestyle blogger Lavenda gives some great insights into the five stages of divorce and how to cope.

8. Having a Child

There is nothing more beautiful than a baby. The birth of a child is a magnificent event. However, it is one that is also filled with great stress. The household will be torn upside down, and you probably won’t get much sleep for a while. The biggest thing with a new child is asking for help when you feel overwhelmed.

You should rest when the child is resting. Ask others to step in and help out when they can. Baby support groups online can help with tips and tricks for dealing with newborn stress. If you can afford it, hire someone to help a few days a week. It will make you and baby happier to focus on feedings and sleep.

Since 90% of couples say their marriage declined after the birth of a child, make sure to nurture that relationship too.

9. Having Financial Difficulties

Seeing a zero balance in the check book is horrifying. When your paychecks get cut, you need to make up the money some other way. Try getting a part time job, even a paper route could help out. Sell some things on eBay and other online outlets.

If your home is in foreclosure, there are numerous programs out there that can help. Talk to your mortgage lender about doing a loan modification. It may save your home. If the process is too far along, then focus on finding a new place to dwell. Financial problems are not fun no matter what the cause.

Being faced with financial losses can be unbearable. There are many community organizations that can help you. Job and Family Services and Community Action are places that can help with the first month’s rent and deposit. If your income has taken a hit and you lost your home, seek resources in your community.

10. Legal Issues

Being arrested, accused of a crime or going to jail is a cause of stress. You can always get free counsel no matter what the crime. The court is required to give you representation, without cost, if you are indigent. In these situations, it’s best, to be honest with everyone, including yourself.

If your legal difficulties were caused by a substance abuse problem, there are also many programs, including some court appointed ones, that can help you conquer this addiction.

Being Proactive With Stress

No matter what life throws at you, it is better to have a plan rather than to let the anxiety and fear control your life.

Try to find solutions to the problems rather than fretting and worrying about the outcomes.

Did you know that many of the things that you fear won’t even happen? Your body and mind don’t need any extra stress. Don’t borrow trouble from tomorrow. Learn to live in the moment.

Источник: https://mellowed.com/stressful-situations/

10 Tricks Successful People Use to Stay Calm in Stressful Situations

Prayer For Stressful Situations

Last Updated on June 18, 2019

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

From Making Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get your house.

But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

Scroll down to continue reading article If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

Desktop software Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit.

Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do Sandy quite a bit.

More About Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Источник: https://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/10-tricks-successful-people-use-stay-calm-stressful-situations.html

Coping With Stressful Situations

Prayer For Stressful Situations

Sometimes a stressful situation just lasts a moment — getting through a school play audition or making the foul shot that could win the game.

But life also can bring situations that might keep us stressed for a few days, weeks, or months. Even if we're not always thinking about this stress, it can be a background soundtrack playing in our lives.

If you're most people, you've faced these kinds of lasting stressful situations. Feeling unprepared or unhappy about the situation increases the stress. Stressful situations can wear us down over time. Finding ways to deal with them can help us grow strong.

Build Good Coping Skills

How well — or how poorly — we get through a stressful situation depends a lot on us. How we deal with stressful situations makes all the difference.

Here are some steps you can take to cope with a stressful situation.

1. Understand the Situation

  • Take some time to think about the situation you're facing. Try to describe your situation in a sentence or two. What's stressful about this situation for you right now? It can help to write down your thoughts. For example: My family just moved, so I switched to a new school in the middle of the year. The stressful parts are not knowing anyone, missing my old friends, and dealing with all new schoolwork.
  • Notice and name the feelings you have about the situation. Accept your feelings — it's understandable to feel the way you feel, given your situation. It can help to write down your feelings, too. For example: I feel lonely and sad because of missing old friends and my old school. I'm mad that we had to move, especially now. I'm worried about keeping up in math and social studies. I feel left out because I'm the new kid. I guess anyone would feel this way if they were in my situation.
  • Learn more. Learn all you can about the situation you're dealing with. This might include reading about it, talking to others, or finding out what others in your situation have done and what to expect. Learning helps you feel more confident and prepared — plus it reminds you that you're not the only one who has gone through this.

2. Commit to a Positive Attitude

A positive attitude helps stop you from being dragged down by unhappy feelings. A positive attitude also boosts the problem solving that a stressful situation requires.

A positive attitude helps us see the possibilities within a situation, while negative thinking narrows our view.

  • Don't dwell on the negative. Don't get stuck dwelling on negative feelings — or focusing on the bad aspects of your situation for too long. Your power lies in how you react to — and cope with — the situation you're facing. Be aware of any negative thoughts ( “I can't do this”), and replace them with more encouraging words. This is the time to believe in yourself. For example: Others have switched schools before and come through it. I know I can manage this.
  • Notice and appreciate life's good stuff. Be sure to notice some positive things in your life, too. Yes, even now. Each day, think of three things you're grateful for. Gratitude helps fuel a positive attitude and keeps problems — even the big ones — in perspective.

3. Take Action

  • Decide what you can do. Pinpoint which parts of the situation you have the power to change or influence for the better. Think of actions you can take to improve any part of your stressful situation. For example: I can talk to the guy who sits next to me in social studies class. I'll ask if he'll share notes and study with me. That could help me make a new friend — plus catch up in social studies.
  • Get support. Find someone to talk to about your situation. Ask for help or advice. Be with people who believe in you, make you laugh, and help you feel good about yourself. Sometimes just a listening ear helps a lot. It helps you know that someone understands and cares about what you're going through.
  • Care for yourself. Take especially good care of yourself when stress in your life is high. Be sure to eat nutritious foods and minimize junk food. Get daily exercise and sleep. Do something every day that helps you relax — whether it's yoga, a soothing bath, cooking, playing with your pet, taking a walk, listening to music, or playing your guitar.

Stressful situations can test our strength, for sure. Whatever you're facing, it can help to think through the situation, accept the emotions you feel, and keep a positive attitude.

Focus your efforts on what you can influence, get support, and care for yourself.

All these things can help you cope with your situation, lessen the stress, and help you come through feeling strong and confident.

Reviewed by: D'Arcy Lyness, PhD

Date reviewed: October 2016

Источник: https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/stress-situations.html

A Prayer for Stress & Anxiety – Prayers

Prayer For Stressful Situations

Is stress holding you hostage and keeping you from rest? Do you feel burdens pressing in that seem too heavy to bear? When anxious thoughts pull you in the wrong direction, and you're struggling to find balance, the following prayer might express your thoughts and help you find relief and freedom.

Before praying, consider these 4 steps for praying over anxiety, as suggested by well-known author and speaker Max Lucado: 

  1. Pray immediately.
    “Don’t stew over the problems that are besetting you or your neighbor. Ask God for help as soon as you identify a need.”
  2. Pray specifically.
    “When we boil our concerns down to a specific request, they become right-sized. Vague threats loom larger than concrete challenges.”
  3. Pray for and with others.
    “When we consider the problems of others and enlist their help with ours, our concerns become more manageable.”
  4. Pray with thanksgiving.
    “Anxiety and gratitude cannot occupy the same space. When we catalog what are thankful for, our list of challenges grows less powerful.”

A Prayer for Relief of Stress and Anxiety

Lord Jesus, the stresses in my life often reach a dangerous proportion—or so it seems. My body, mind, and spirit struggle to keep up physically, mentally, and yes, spiritually.

Some days anxiety stalks me a deceitful predator, and the temptation to worry draws me in. I know better, but some days the challenges outweigh the truths buried inside.

My trust in You fades into the background, giving fear and concerns permission to discourage me.

In those moments of apprehension, help me remember that I belong to You, and that You are not the author of fear or anxiety, but the giver of love and a sound mind. Teach me Your ways to respond to problems by giving thanks in them. Your Word assures me that You are always there with me.

You are the Blessed Controller of all things, and nothing escapes Your attention in my life. You have given me every tool and spiritual blessing to fight against those things that try to steal my peace. You’ve promised that when I’m stressed and burdens are trying to weigh me down, I can come to You.

You will give me sweet rest!

Whether the anxiety stems from work, parenting, finances, physical issues, or even world conditions, You are there, Lord, to shoulder the weight. Teach me to recognize the stressful trials as tools for you to shape me and rearrange me.

Through those difficult times, You will teach me patience, enlarge my faith, and help me see things I couldn't see earlier—if I will only let You. When I'm clueless as to what to do, Lord, I want to turn to you first, not last.

Forgive me for trying to handle things on my own, Lord. The need to be in control sometimes gets a stronghold on my life. That only makes things worse. I want to trust You more and see things from Your perspective, not my own. No one makes me feel uptight, angry, or stressed, and no one forces me to react negatively. I choose to respond according to my beliefs.

Do I believe You are in control? Do I believe You created all things and hold all things in Your Hand? Do I believe You are truly good? When an anxious thought creeps in, help me to stop and relax, to take that thought captive, and to turn apprehension into a calm prayer for deliverance. Revamp my belief system, Lord.

Show me a new way to handle life according to Your Way.

No matter what issues I am dealing with; no matter how big the problems or situations, I'm laying them all at Your feet today. Turn these potentials for stress into lessons for growth and trust.

When I can't see any possible solutions, I choose to believe that You are working things out for my good—in Your own time, as you have in the past. Show me what to do, or what not to do.

As I focus on You, remembering Your promises and Your words, I believe You will fill me with a peace that is beyond all understanding.

In Your precious name,
Amen

A Short Prayer for An Anxious Heart

Dear Lord, I thank you that I can come to You always for any reason. I’m grateful that when I pray to You, You answer me.

Help me to come to You at the beginning of my fears and anxieties instead of waiting until I can’t stand them anymore. The quicker I come to You the better. You want to free me from ALL my fears.

Help me look to You for help more often so that I can be radiant with Your joy. In Jesus’ name, I pray, Amen.

– Jennifer Heeren

Rebecca Barlow Jordan is an inspirational author, speaker, and passionate follower of Jesus who loves to encourage others heart to heart.

She has written 11 books and over 1700 other articles, greeting cards, and other inspirational pieces. Her daily devotional Daily in Your Presence is available for delivery through Crosswalk.com.

You can find out more about Rebecca at www.rebeccabarlowjordan.com.

This article is part of our larger Prayers resource meant to inspire and encourage your prayer life when you face uncertain times. Visit our most popular prayers if you are wondering how to pray or what to pray. Remember, the Holy Spirit intercedes for us and God knows your heart even if you can't find the words to pray.

Prayer for Healing
Prayer for Strength
Prayer for Protection
Morning Prayers
Good Night Prayers
Serenity Prayer
A Birthday Prayer
Sinner’s Prayer
Prayer for Forgiveness
Prayer for Guidance
Intercessory Prayer
Prayer for Peace
Prayer for Faith
Prayer for Love

Источник: https://www.biblestudytools.com/bible-study/prayers/a-prayer-for-stress-anxiety.html

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