Prayer For A Sick Newborn Baby

A Scriptural Prayer For Your Sick Child

Prayer For A Sick Newborn Baby

In a previous post, Praying for a Sick Child, I shared the story of my son’s heart surgery, how God answered my whole-hearted request, and graciously taught me how to pray.

Our God, proving once again how real he is . . . providing glaring evidence of his existence. 

Today I want to share a prayer ( scripture) for parents to use as they pray for a sick child – because sometimes the words are impossible to find when the diagnosis is incomprehensible.

I know the reality of hurting so badly you can’t find words to pray. There was a time in my life when I just sat in silence before God. That, in and of itself, was prayer. 

Coming empty. Devoid of words. Wasted in strength. Placing ourselves before the throne of grace.

In those times when the diagnosis is heart-breaking and we can’t find words, God hears our hearts.

When the words won’t come, friends and family can stand in the gap – uttering those concerns with lips able to speak on our behalf.

As you read this prayer, you’ll see scripture addresses. I’m not including links to those addresses  I normally do. The reason? If you’re in a crisis situation, the best thing is for you to put your hands on a physical Bible, crack open its pages, and drink in the words. As you do, you create opportunities for God to lead you to other verses that might be helpful.

Take his words to heart. They. Are. Life.

As you pray, remember how important it is for you and your spouse to be united as you pray for a sick child.  Carry your child to God together.

A Prayer When Your Child is Seriously Ill

Strong and Faithful Father,

My heart is breaking for my child, (insert child’s name here). The weight of this situation is so heavy it’s difficult to breathe. My words choke out in fragments. Sometimes they don’t come at all. Articulating thoughts requires more energy than I have, so I just sit in silence.

My strength is gone. I’m anxious, Father. This situation doesn’t make sense to me. My child, (insert name here), is so innocent and vulnerable. I don’t understand why this is happening.

Help me to trust you with (child’s name) life . . .  with every aspect of this situation . . . with all the pieces of my life. Keep me from attempting to rely on my own understanding because there is no way to understand this. 

Help me trust you with all my heart – not just part of it. I acknowledge that everything in the heavens and earth – everything that is precious to me including (child’s name) – belongs to you. (Proverbs 3:5-6)

This is your kingdom not mine. I adore you and recognize you are in control of everything. (1 Chronicles 29:11; 1)

Your ways are higher than my ways. Your thoughts are higher than my thoughts. (Isaiah 55:8-10; Romans 11:33-34)

You are good, loving, and faithful. It’s absolutely impossible for you to do evil or to do wrong. Help me to believe this in the depths of my soul during this time. (Deut. 32:4; Job 34:10; 1 John 1:5; Psalm 86:15; Psalm 100:5)

Thank you God for remaining faithful even when I act faithless in my pain. Your love, presence, power, and promises are not dependent on my behavior. (2 Timothy 2:13)

You understand my pain. (Isaiah 53:3)

Give us strength because we are flat out weary. Help us run this grueling race with perseverance and never give up.

Help us keep our eyes glued to Jesus, our champion, who perfects our faith. In him all things hold together. We will depend on him to hold us together no matter what comes. (Colossians 1:17, Hebrews 12:1-3)

Father, I love and adore (child’s name). Thank you for entrusting (child’s name) to me. It is such a privilege being (child’s name) parent. I humbly ask you to bring complete healing to (child’s name) and make (child’s name) physically whole if that’s your will.

If it isn’t your will for (child’s name) to heal during his/her time on earth, I will still love, serve, and follow you. 

I know that you are for (child’s name), not against (child’s name). No illness, disease, disappointment or setback – nothing in all the world – can separate (child’s name) from your love. (Romans 8:35-39)

I ask you to protect (child’s name) emotionally and spiritually. Give (child’s name) the strength he/she needs for each moment, each test, each prod, each pill, each surgery. (Luke 11:1-4) With your great love, drive out all (child’s name) fear and comfort (child’s name). 1 John 4:18

Even though I can’t see it now, I believe that in all things you work for the good of those who love you. No matter what happens, you will bring beauty from the ashes of this time. (Romans 8:28-29; Isaiah 61:3)

I thank you God for continuing to work good in me, transforming me into your image, and perfecting me until the day Jesus returns. Use this struggle, Father, for your glory and renown. (Philippians 1:6; 2 Corinthians 3:18) 

Thank you for being with (child’s name) in the fire. There is always hope with you. (Genesis 50:20; 2 Peter 3;9; Isaiah 43:2; Isaiah 61:3)

I submit myself, this situation, and (child’s name) to you, God – 100%. I trust you with the outcome. I will rely on your strength completely.  

I pray these things in the name of Jesus.

Amen.

If you have a sick child, I’m truly sorry for your suffering. I know what it feels , and wouldn’t wish that on anyone. Please let me know how I can pray for you and your family.

If you or someone you know has a child with a congenital heart defect, check out Mended Little Hearts for support, education, and to determine where parents of children with a CHD are meeting in your area. 

Lisa~

Other links you might :

Scriptures to Pray Over Your Family

Источник: http://www.mywarminghouse.com/a-scriptural-prayer-for-your-sick-child/

Jewish Newborn Ceremonies 101

Prayer For A Sick Newborn Baby

A baby is born or adopted into a Jewish family, and through that, into a covenantal community.

From the ancient tradition of circumcision to contemporary, innovative ceremonies, a new Jewish boy or girl becomes a focal point for ritual and celebration.

The choosing of a name becomes an opportunity to connect with people, stories, events, and associations that are significant to the parents.

History and Development

The practice of circumcising baby boys (brit milah, or “the covenant of circumcision”) has its roots in Abraham’s circumcising the male members of his household, as recorded in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is a deep and persistent symbol of covenant and continuity for the Jewish people.

A parallel ceremony for girls (often called a simchat bat, “celebration of a daughter,” or brit banot, “daughters’ covenant”) is a contemporary development with historical and cultural predecessors, inspired by Jewish feminism, and practiced in most liberal and some traditional communities. Families and communities have also acknowledged and celebrated the arrival of babies in many other ways throughout Jewish history, and in different Jewish traditions throughout the world, with a variety of home and synagogue rituals of celebration and naming.

Liturgy, Ritual, and Custom

For boys, the ceremony for brit milah (also known as a “bris”) traditionally takes place on the eighth day of life, and includes words of blessing, the circumcision itself, and the giving of a name.

Traditionally the responsibility of the baby’s father, the act of circumcision is usually performed (according to prescribed custom) by a mohel, an individual trained in the practice and its rituals.

For many girls, the much newer simchat bat or brit banot (frequently referred to in English as a “baby naming”) can take place on a variety of days. It often follows a similar structure as the brit milah, with one of several covenantal or welcoming acts (e.g.

, candlelighting, footwashing, or being wrapped in a tallit [prayer shawl]) as the ritual centerpiece. Some families follow the simpler and longer-standing custom of having their new daughter receive her Hebrew or Yiddish name during a synagogue Torah-reading service, rather than holding a freestanding simchat bat.

Just as the longstanding tradition of brit milah for boys inspired the creation of parallel ceremonies for girls, the creative approach to tradition that has marked simchat bat ceremonies has in many cases shaped the way that brit milah is celebrated, for example, with fuller involvement of the mother, and an emphasis on themes equally applicable to girls and boys.

In Practice

A ceremony and celebration for a Jewish baby is often planned in a hurry after the baby is born. Fortunately, there are many resources available to parents and families to help with the planning a brit milah or a simchat bat.

Those attending such an event have a special role to play as family and community members. Enjoying the festive meal (or seudah) is considered a sacred obligation.

Families may mark the occasion with a tzedakah (charity) donation or other social action project, or continue the ancient custom of planting a tree in honor of each child.

Pidyon HaBen

Jewish tradition mandates a ceremony in which first-born Jewish males (those who are the first to “open the womb” of their mother) are “redeemed” from the service of the ancient priests.

It is usually a small, private ceremony in which someone who is believed to be a descendant from the priestly class (a cohen) symbolically releases the child back to his parents.

It is mainly practiced today by traditionally observant Jews.

Issues

The encounter between tradition and modernity, and between different Jewish customs, raises interesting questions about ceremonies of welcoming, naming, and covenant.

What are the connections and differences between ceremonies for girls and those for boys? Is there a move toward standardization or diversity in ceremonies for girls? And what happens when Jewish tradition collides with contemporary debates about the morality and effects of circumcision? Finally with a large percentage of Jews marrying non-Jews, some couples debate what faith tradition to raise their child, and if both, then how are newborn ceremonies reflecting those decisions?

For more Jewish parenting help, visit our partner site Kveller.

Pronounced: breet mee-LAH, Origin: Hebrew, literally “covenant of circumcision,” the Jewish circumcision ceremony for an 8-day-old boy, marking the covenant between God and the Jews. Also known as a bris.

Pronounced: SEEM-khat BAHT, Origin: Hebrew, ceremony welcoming a Jewish baby girl, also known as a brit bat.

Pronounced: tzuh-DAH-kuh, Origin: Hebrew, from the Hebrew root for justice, charitable giving.

Empower your Jewish discovery, daily

Источник: https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/jewish-newborn-ceremonies-101/

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