Prayer For Christians in Israel

Christians in Israel

Prayer For Christians in Israel

This article originally appeared on The Jewish Virtual Library, a source for information about Jewish history, Israel, U.S.-Israel relations, the Holocaust, anti-Semitism, and Judaism created by the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise and is reprinted with permission.

The history of the Christian communities in the Land of Israel begins with the life and ministry of Jesus of Nazareth.

After his death the early Apostolic Church, at least that in and around Jerusalem, remained Judeo­Christian until the rebuilding of Jerusalem (c. 130 CE) by Hadrian as the Roman city of Aelia Capitolina.

Since this date the local Church has been entirely gentile in composition. It was also one and undivided, until the early Ecumenical Councils.

By the time of the Muslim conquest the Church in the East was already subdivided into various sects, although they seem to have continued to share in the use of the Holy Places.

It was only with the Crusader Kingdoms, and the paramountcy (praedominium) enjoyed by the (Latin) Church of the West, that contention arose regarding the Holy Places and continued unabated through the Mamluk and Ottoman periods until the declaration of the Status Quo in 1852 .

Christian Communities Today

Of the over 7 million people living in Israel today (September 2011), Christians constitute about 2% of the population (Jews 75.5%, Muslims 16.5%, Druze 1.7% and 4.4% not classified by religion).

The Christian communities may be divided into four basic categories: ­ Orthodox, Non­Chalcedonian (Monophysite), Catholic (Latin and Uniate) and Protestant ­ consisting of some 20 ancient and indigenous churches, and another 30, primarily Protestant, denominational groups. Except for national churches, such as the Armenian, the indigenous communities are predominantly Arabic­speaking; most of them, very ly, descendants of the early Christian communities of the Byzantine period.

The Orthodox Churches

The Orthodox Church (also termed Eastern or Greek­Orthodox Church) consists of a family of Churches all of which acknowledge the honorary primacy of the Patriarch of Constantinople. Historically, this Church developed from the Churches of the East Roman or Byzantine Empire.

The Greek Orthodox Patriarchate considers itself to be the Mother Church of Jerusalem, to whose bishop patriarchal dignity was granted by the Council of Chalcedon in 451. Since 1054 it has been in schism with Rome. However, in 1964 a historic meeting between Pope Paul VI and the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Athenagoras, was held in Jerusalem.

After 1099 and the Crusader conquest, the (Orthodox) patriarchate of Jerusalem, already in exile, was removed to Constantinople. Permanent residence in Jerusalem was not reestablished until 1845.

Since 1662, direction of Orthodox interests in the Holy Land has rested with the Brotherhood of the Holy Sepulcher, which has sought to safeguard the status of the Orthodox Church in the Holy Places, and to preserve the Hellenistic character of the Patriarchate.

The parishes are predominantly Arabic­ speaking, and are served by Arab married priests as well as by members of the Brotherhood of the Holy Sepulcher. The community numbers about 120,000 in Jerusalem, the Galilee, Judea, Samaria, and Gaza.

Two other historic Orthodox national churches also have representation in the country: the Russian and the Rumanian. Being in communion with the Greek Orthodox Church, they are under the local jurisdiction of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate.

The Russian Orthodox mission was established in Jerusalem in 1858, but Russian Christians had begun visiting the Holy Land in the 11th century, only a few years after the Conversion of Kiev. Such visits continued over the next 900 years, eventually growing into the great annual pilgrimages of the late 19th century, which continued until World War I, and ended with the Russian Revolution.

Since 1949, title to Russian church properties in what was by then the territory of Israel has been held by the Russian Orthodox Mission (Patriarchate of Moscow); title to properties in areas then under Jordanian control remains with the Russian Ecclesiastical Mission representing the Russian Orthodox Church in Exile. The two missions are each led by an archimandrite, who is assisted by a number of monks and nuns.

A mission representing the Rumanian Orthodox Church was established in 1935. It is led by an archimandrite and consists of a small community of monks and nuns resident in Jerusalem.

The Non­Chalcedonian Churches

The Non­Chalcedonian churches are churches of the East ­ Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, and Syrian ­ that rejected the teaching of the Council of Chalcedon (451) on the double (divine and human) nature of Christ. The non­Chalcedonian churches hold the Monophysite doctrine that in Christ there was but a single, divine nature.

The Armenian Orthodox Church dates from the year 301 and the conversion of Armenia, the first nation to embrace Christianity.

An Armenian religious community has been present in Jerusalem since the 5th century.

Armenian sources date the first Patriarchate to a charter given by the Caliph Omar to Patriarch Abraham in the year 638. The Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem was established in 1311.

Throughout the 19th century and during and immediately after World War I, the local Armenian community grew with the absorption of survivors of the Anatolian massacres, particularly those of 1915. Before 1939 the community numbered more than 15,000, and was the third largest Christian group. Today, the community numbers about 4,000 ­ in Jerusalem, Haifa, Jaffa, and Bethlehem.

The Coptic Orthodox Church has its roots in Egypt, where most of the population became Christian during the first centuries. They claim to have arrived in Jerusalem with St. Helena, mother of the Emperor Constantine.

This church had an early influence on the development of desert monasticism in the wilderness of Judea. The community flourished during the Mamluk period (1250­-1517), and again with Mohammed Ali in 1830.

Since the 13th century the (Coptic) Patriarch of Alexandria has been represented in Jerusalem by a resident archbishop. The community numbers just over 1,000 members-in Jerusalem, Bethlehem, and Nazareth.

The Ethiopian Orthodox Church has had a community in Jerusalem since at least the Middle Ages. Early Church historians mention Ethiopian pilgrims in the Holy Land as early as the 4th century.

What is certain is that during the centuries that followed the Ethiopian Church enjoyed important rights in the Holy Places, but lost most of them during the Turkish period, prior to the declaration of the Status Quo.

Today the Ethiopian Church in Israel is a small community led by an archbishop and consisting mostly of a few dozen monks and nuns (although the lay community is growing), living in the Old City and around the Ethiopian Church in West Jerusalem. Since the reestablishment of diplomatic relations between Israel and Ethiopia pilgrimage has increased ­ with almost 1,000 Ethiopian pilgrims participating in Holy Week observances in 1995.

The Syrian Orthodox Church is a successor to the ancient Church of Antioch, and one of the oldest Christian communities in the Middle East. Among its traditions is the continued use of the Syriac language (Western Aramaic) in the liturgy and prayers.

They are also known as Jacobites (after Jacob Baradaeus, who organized the Church in the 6th century). Their patriarch is resident in Damascus. There have been Syrian Orthodox bishops in Jerusalem since 793; permanently, since 1471. Today the local Church is headed by a bishop, who resides in Jerusalem at the 7th century monastery of St.

Mark. The community numbers about 2,000, most of whom live in Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

The Apostolic Church of the East (sometimes erroneously called Nestorians), originating from the border area between Turkey, Iran, and Iraq, follows the liturgy and prayers in the Syriac language (East Aramaic). Since 1917, its patriarch resides in Chicago and Kerala (India). The church’s presence in Jerusalem was established in the 5th century. Today it is represented by an archbishop.

The Latin and Uniate Churches

Whatever the relations between Rome and Constantinople, there was no attempt to establish a Western Church in the Holy Land independent of the Orthodox Patriarchate until the Crusader period, during which a Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem was in existence from 1099 to 1291. The office was again constituted in 1847. Until then, responsibility for the local church rested with the Franciscan Order, which served as Custodian of Latin holy places since the 14th century.

Today the Latin Church of Jerusalem is headed by a patriarch, assisted by three vicars (resident in Nazareth, Amman, and Cyprus). The community in Israel numbers about 20,000 (with another 10,000 in the West Bank and Gaza).

The Maronite Church is a Christian community of Syrian origin, most of whose members live in Lebanon.

The Maronite Church has been in formal communion with the Roman Catholic Church since 1182, and is the only Eastern church which is entirely Catholic.

As a Uniate body (an Eastern Church in communion with Rome, which yet retains its respective language, rites, and canon law) they possess their own liturgy, which is in essence an Antiochene rite in the Syriac language.

The Maronite community in Israel numbers about 6,700, most of whom live in the Galilee. The Maronite Patriarchal Vicariate in Jerusalem dates from 1895.

The Greek Melkite Catholic Church came into being in 1724, the result of a schism in the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch. (The term ‘Melkite’ dates from the 4th century and refers to those local Christians who accepted the Definition of Faith of the Council of Chalcedon and remained in communion with the “Imperial” see of Constantinople.)

A Greek Catholic archdiocese was established in the Galilee in 1752. Twenty years later, Greek Catholics of Jerusalem were placed under the jurisdiction of the Melkite patriarch of Antioch, who is represented in Jerusalem by a patriarchal vicar. The present population of the Greek Catholic diocese of Galilee is about 50,000; the diocese of Jerusalem, about 3,000.

The Syrian Catholic Church, a uniate breakaway from the monophysite Syrian Orthodox church, has been in communion with Rome since 1663.

The Syrian Catholics have their own patriarch (resident in Beirut), and since 1890, a patriarchal vicar in Jerusalem has served as spiritual leader of the small local community there and in Bethlehem, which totals about 350.

In July 1985, the community consecrated the new patriarchal church in Jerusalem dedicated to St. Thomas, apostle to the peoples of Syria and India.

The Armenian Catholic Church separated from the Armenian Orthodox Church in 1741, though previously an Armenian community in Cilicia (in southern Anatolia) had been in contact with Rome since the Crusader period.

The Armenian Catholic patriarch is resident in Beirut because at the time, Ottoman authorities forbade residency in Constantinople. A patriarchal vicariate was established in Jerusalem in 1842.

The Armenian Catholic community in the Holy Land numbers about 900 members, living in Jerusalem, Bethany, Ramallah, Haifa, and Gaza.

Though in union with Rome, the church has good relations with the Armenian Orthodox Church, and both cooperate for the benefit of the community as a whole.

The Coptic Catholic Church has been in union with Rome since 1741, but only in 1955 did the uniate Coptic Catholic Patriarch of Alexandria appoint a patriarchal vicar to Jerusalem, where the community today numbers about 35.

The Chaldean Catholic Church is a uniate descendant of the ancient Nestorian (Assyrian) church. Its members still preserve the use of Syriac as their liturgical language. It was established in 1551, and its patriarch is resident in Baghdad.

The community in the Holy Land numbers no more than a few families; even so, the Chaldean Catholic Church retains the status of a ‘recognized’ religious community. Since 1903, the Chaldeans have been represented in Jerusalem by a non­resident patriarchal vicar.

Of major significance for the Catholic Churches in the Holy Land, was the signing, on the 30th of December 1993, of a Fundamental Agreement between the Holy See and the State of Israel which lead to the establishment of full diplomatic relations between them a few months later.

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Источник: https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/christians-in-israel/

Prayer » Christian Watch

Prayer For Christians in Israel

GUIDANCE NOTES FOR PRAYER AND REFLECTION Please circulate and share with others

♦ We have driven the Lord Jesus Christ our culture, our Government and the education of our children. In the void, we have replaced Him with idols, greed, carnality, materialism and immorality. We have polluted the land with pornography, profaned the sacred and sanctified the profane. No nation that does this can expect God’s blessing of protection to remain

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Written by Christian Watch on . Posted in Prayer

Dear friends in the Lord, and my dear brother David Crowter

I believe you are OK. Our God is faithful. In the last year we have gone through difficulties, my wife and I we were sick, but we have seen His favour and grace and now we are healed . To God be the glory. I never hear from you, but I believe you are OK.

We bring your names before God daily for His grace and believe (trust?) for the care of you all. We are still praying for you to come and visit our churches and hold a conference. The doors are open for you to come. Also our children need your prayers, as the schools re-opened last week.

Please give my sincere greetings to all friends. We love you all.

Your brother Pastor Ondara Yeye

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Christian Watch UPDATE PRAYER ALERT FOR ISRAEL

The situation in Gaza and Southern Israel –
Update: On Monday 19th November 2012 800 missiles were fired from Gaza – The Iron Dome have been continuously intercepting missiles since Wednesday 14 November……..

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Bethel Prayer Meeting Address
by Mr. B. A. Ramsbotton (Bethel Chapel, Luton)

No doubt you must have noticed that in the latter part of the Old Testament the Lord is often spoken of as the God of heaven. And what a title! He is there in heaven, on the throne, almighty, in control.

So what an encouragement to these Old Testament saints to pray to “the God of heaven,” the One who with heaven and earth at His command waits to answer prayer.” And, ‘much more believers now, in this more favoured day.’ Not just the God of heaven, but the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Not just seeing Him almighty, but seeing the throne of grace, being enabled to come as sinners pleading the name of Jesus on mercy’s ground, pleading the blood of Jesus……

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Written by Christian Watch on . Posted in Prayer

None can believe how powerful prayer is, and what it is able to effect, but those who have learned it by experience.

It is a great matter, when in extreme need, to take hold on prayer. I know, whenever I have earnestly prayed, I have been amply heard, and have obtained more than I prayed for; God indeed sometimes delayed, but at last He came.

Ecclesiastes says, “The prayer of a good and godly Christian availeth more to health than the physician’s prescription.”

O, how great a thing, how marvellous, a godly Christian’s prayer is! How powerful with God; that a poor human creature should speak with God’s high Majesty in heaven, and not be afraid but, on the contrary, know that God smiles upon him for Christ’s sake, His dearly beloved Son. The heart and conscience, in this act of praying, must not fly and recoil backwards because of his sins and unworthiness, or stand in doubt, or be frightened away…….

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The Christian should join prayer to all other means because of the great prevalency that prayer hath with God. He will do no great matter for a saint without prayer, and nothing is too great for Him to do at his request.

Prayer, Jonathan’s bow, when duly qualified as to the person and act, never returns empty. Never was faithful prayer lost at sea. No merchant trades with such certainty as the praying saint.

Some prayers indeed have a longer voyage than other; but then they come with the richer lading at last into the port. In trading, he gets most by his commodity that can forebear his money longest.

So does the Christian that can with most patience stay for a return of his prayer. Such a soul shall never be ashamed of his waiting.

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By Ronald Reagan – Late President of the United States Of America

Prayer is deeply woven into the fabric of our history from its very beginnings. The same Continental Congress that declared our independence also proclaimed a National Day of Prayer. And from that time forward, it would be hard to exaggerate the role that prayer has played in the lives of individual Americans and in the life of the Nation as a whole.

Our greatest leaders have always turned to prayer at times of crisis.

We recall the moving story of George Washington kneeling in the snow at Valley Forge to ask for divine assistance when the fate of our fledgling Nation hung in the balance.

And Abraham Lincoln tells us that on the eve of the Battle of Gettysburg, “I went into my room and got down on my knees in prayer.” Never before, he added, had he prayed “with as much earnestness.”

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Источник: https://www.christianwatch.org.uk/category/prayer/

Israel Mandate

Prayer For Christians in Israel

The International House of Prayer (IHOPKC) is committed to seeing the nation of Israel walking in their full destiny at the end of the age. Our primary role is to pray for and partner with Messianic Jews living in Israel, and to pray for God’s purposes in the nation of Israel.

The operation and visitation of the Spirit in Israel is a vital part of releasing the great end-time harvest among the nations (Ezek. 36:23–36).

However, this full release of the Spirit will only come as a result of a body of believers who are committed to a life of night-and-day prayer and fasting.

Jesus Himself prophesied that He would raise up a last-day prayer movement that would cry out for the Jewish people (Isa. 56:6–7; 62:6–7). We take this mandate seriously.

Our mission is to mobilize an international prayer movement that would pray 24/7 for the nation of Israel to receive their Jewish Messiah, Yeshua (Jesus).

Jesus promised the nation of Israel an unusual visitation of His presence at the end of the age, when the Jewish leaders will recognize Him as their true Messiah and deliverer (Mt. 23:39).

We invite you to get involved and join us in praying for the nation of Israel. Join us on the free prayer room webstream, or in the Global Prayer Room here in Kansas City during our prayer meetings that focus on Israel.

Israel Prayer Schedule

Monday1–2pmGlobal Prayer Room, Side Room 4
Tuesday12–2am; 4–6am; 10am-12pm; 4–6pm; 8–10pmGlobal Prayer Room
Tuesday8:00–9:00amGlobal Prayer Room, Side Room 12
Tuesday3:00–4:00pmGlobal Prayer Room, Side Room 6
Tuesday10am–12pm (in Chinese)All Nations Prayer Room
Wednesday9–10amGlobal Prayer Room, Side Room 4
Wednesday1–2pmGlobal Prayer Room, Side Room 3

*Email israelmandate@ihopkc.org for information
Please note that only the Global Prayer Room is streamed; prayer in side rooms is not on our webstream.

Houses of Prayer in Jerusalem

Succat Hallel » (Succat hallel means “tabernacle of praise.”)
Jerusalem House of Prayer for All Nations »
Jerusalem Prayer Tower »
Mishkan Elohai » (Mishkan elohai means “the dwelling place of my God.”)

Scriptures to Use in Prayer for Israel

“For Zion’s sake I will not hold my peace, and for Jerusalem’s sake I will not rest, until her righteousness goes forth as brightness, and her salvation as a lamp that burns.” (Isa. 62:1)

Jerusalem’s End-Time Significance

Jesus “bound” Himself by His own prophecy, saying He would only come back and rule in Jerusalem when Israel’s leaders ask Him to reign as King over them.

“O Jerusalem! Jerusalem . . . How often have I wanted to gather your children together . . . but you were not willing . . . for I say to you, you shall see Me no more till you say, ‘Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord.’” (Mt. 23:37, 39)

The Armageddon campaign is a battle for Jerusalem

Military forces of all nations will gather in one place and lay siege against Jerusalem.

“And it shall happen in that day that I will make Jerusalem a very heavy stone for all the peoples; all who would heave it away will surely be cut to pieces, though all the nations of the earth are gathered against it.” (Zech. 12:3)

“For I will gather all the nations to battle against Jerusalem.” (Zech. 14:2)

Jesus will bring military breakthrough.

“In that day the Lord will defend the inhabitants of Jerusalem; the one who is feeble among them in that day shall be David, and the house of David shall be God, the Angel of the Lord before them. It shall be in that day that I shall seek to destroy all the nations that come against Jerusalem.” (Zech. 12:8–9)

“Then the Lord will go forth and fight against those nations, as He fights in the day of battle.” (Zech. 14:3)

At the same time, Jesus will bring spiritual breakthrough.

“And I will pour on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem the Spirit of grace and supplication; then they will look on Me whom they pierced. Yes, they will mourn for Him as one mourns for his only son, and grieve for Him as one grieves for a firstborn” (Zech. 12:9-10)

“And it shall come to pass that whoever calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved. For in Mount Zion and in Jerusalem there shall be deliverance, as the Lord has said, among the remnant whom the Lord calls.” (Joel 2:32)

Jesus will rule over all nations from His throne of glory in Jerusalem.

“For the Lord has chosen Zion; He has desired it for His dwelling place. This is My resting place forever; here I will dwell, for I have desired it.” (Ps. 132:13–14)

Источник: https://www.ihopkc.org/israelmandate/prayer-for-israel/

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