Prayer When Word Is Difficult To Find

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When Prayer Is Difficult

Prayer When Word Is Difficult To Find

I appeal to you, brothers, by our Lord Jesus Christ and by the love of the Spirit, to strive together with me in your prayers to God on my behalf. (Romans 15:30)

In my Christian life, I have found that prayer is a difficult discipline. And I concur with others that praying moves through different seasons. My posture may change, my prayers may change.

But whatever season I am currently facing, my specific prayers are often marked by experiences. If I am doubting, I pray for faith. If I’m hurting, I pray for healing.

If I lack wisdom, I ask God to give me discernment. If this true for you, we are together in the difficult discipline of prayer, for I am no saint when it comes to fervency of prayer.

Prayer is a lagging discipline that needs constant shoring up.

The Difficulty of Prayer

Prayer is a spiritual discipline that needs cultivation. The ground needs to be turned over. Seeds need to be planted and watered. We wait the farmer, trusting the seed will sprout and multiply its blessing.

Prayer takes effort and constant fine-tuning. We learn to pray. We learn what not to say. At one point, Paul commended Epaphras on his fervent prayer life, calling him a struggler in prayer: “Epaphras greets you, always struggling on your behalf in his prayers” (Colossians 4:12). I this descriptor that the apostle uses—prayer is indeed a struggle.

The great theologian and pastor Martyn Lloyd-Jones once commented on the struggle of prayer. He said,

When a man is speaking to God he is at his very acme. It is the highest activity of the human soul, and therefore it is at the same time the ultimate test of a man’s true spiritual condition. There is nothing that tells the truth about us as Christian people so much as our prayer life.¹

Paul, wise, shared his personal struggle. He said, “Brothers, my heart’s desire and prayer to God for them is that they may be saved” (Romans 10:1). Paul’s intense passion for lost people is evident here, and the struggle to pray evangelistically is clearly identified by his words.

Three Reasons Prayer Is Difficult

I believe there are at least three main culprits that inhibit true fervency in prayer.

1. Our flesh is weak (Matthew 26:41)

We have difficulty suppressing physical tiredness and challenges. Perhaps there are days when our mind grows tired. Or we’re physically exhausted from work, from our children, and possibly from weakness due to an illness.

I find that physical weakness is often connected to spiritual weakness (though not always connected). For when the body is weak, our minds can think wrong thoughts about God, and our hearts can begin to believe these thoughts. Prayer time can become ineffective because our minds are distracted and wander to different themes.

I’ve caught myself falling asleep the disciples. In these moments of lapse, I awake and find myself embarrassed or troubled in spirit that I did not labor in prayer. So I pray, “Lord strengthen my body and mind to pray.” Remember that even simple prayers can be launching pads for effective, fervent prayers to the Lord. 

2. Our faith is weary (Mark 9:24)

We sometimes encounter seasons where faith is diminished. Seasons of pain and trials can be factors in a diminished faith. Unanswered prayer can be difficult to understand. When God’s promises go unanswered, we wonder if he is even listening to our requests.

Believer, during seasons of unanswered prayer, remember that God hears you. He is at work. We must fight to believe and trust the Lord, even when we cannot see him at work. “God, help my unbelief” is a simple prayer to say. Sometimes, we have no ornate or theological verbiage to pray. Simple and sweet. Straightforward and honest. So we fight weariness with prayer. 

Spiritual challenges in other people also keep us from praying effectively. People’s burdens can be difficult to manage alone.

I’ve found that small groups, Bible study groups, and other discipleship groups are great opportunities for believers to pray together. Burden-sharing builds unity and lightens the load. Still, the burdens can be unbearable, and we need the Lord’s help.

I’m thankful for Romans 8 that says the “Spirit bears witness with my spirit,” for he speaks on behalf of our inability (Romans 8:26-27).

3. Our pattern is wrong (Matthew 6:7)

Sometimes, we approach prayer with the wrong pattern. We spend more time focusing on personal needs than addressing “our Father who is in heaven.” God is to be glorified. He is to be adorned, and he is to be worshiped. 

Following a pattern for prayer is helpful and keeps us from becoming distracted by a personal wish list. Patterns direct our thoughts back to God. For the disciples, prayer was a difficult discipline that needed refinement.

They grasped their need to pattern their prayers, so they watched Jesus pray. The Teacher provides them (and us) a helpful pattern to be modeled and exercised.

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Read through The Lord’s Prayer in Matthew 6 and notice how God is exalted, sins are confessed, and needs expressed.
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There are contemporary models that can serve as tools for your prayer life, Adoration, Confession, Thanksgiving, and Supplication (ACTS). Or you can simply walk through the Lord’s Prayer by reflecting line-by-line on its main features and applying them specifically to your prayers.

How to Pray Effective Prayers

Why not start with praying Scripture as a simple way to cultivate fervency and effectiveness in prayer? While reading through my Bible, my motivation to pray earnestly grows. Maybe read one verse or passage each day, respond in prayer, and repeat as needed. Here are several starting places:

    • Philippians 1:9-11
    • 2 Thessalonians 1:11-12

Praying for needs is also effective when a person knows exactly what to pray for. Churches can manage and store prayers, develop a prayer list in their bulletins, and send prayer requests through emails. Individuals can collect prayer needs on a list, praying through it and updating it regularly. (It’s important for us to keep our lists up-to-date and to follow up with people.)

There will be seasons when prayer lacks intensity or fervency. It may be right now that you are experiencing prayer’s greatest fight. How about returning to prayer today, by the strength God supplies? He helps you, and he hears you.

[1] Martin Lloyd-Jones, Sermon on the Mount, 2 vols., pp. 2: 46. Photo Credit: Lightstock]

Источник: https://unlockingthebible.org/2017/05/when-prayer-is-difficult/

50 Things To Say When Someone Dies

Prayer When Word Is Difficult To Find

It is always a sad feeling whenever someone close dies, one of the most difficult things for most people to do is to find the right things to say when someone dies.

It’s also very difficult to find something to say to the people affected when someone close to them dies, those undesirable moments has a way of putting us at a loss for words, it can be very difficult to express how we feel during those times.

You can say, “You have my deepest, sincerest sympathy.” “You’re in my thoughts and prayers,” and maybe that’s true. Maybe you actually know what to think or pray on that person’s behalf.

What about words  “I understand…”  “I know how you feel…”
Do you really understand? The fact still remains that words can actually go a long way in amending the broken heart. Here are some words to say when someone dies

Good things to say when someone dies

1. “These things are never easy to write, and with a heavy heart I extend my deepest condolences to you during this dark time. I’m here if you need anything.”

2. “I hope that the love and support from your family and friends, including me, gets you through this time. You’re in my prayers.”

.3. “I wish you nothing but comfort and strength. Rest in peace, _________.”

4. “I’ve never really written a sympathy card before so forgive me if this doesn’t come out sounding right. I am so sorry to hear about this loss and am deeply saddened. If you need anything, know that you’re not alone. I’m here for you.”

5. “While there’s nothing I can do to change what happened, I can continue to offer you my love and support.

6. Extending my most heartfelt condolences to you and your family.”

7. “You have my deepest, sincerest sympathy.”

8. “I am praying for you during your time of loss. Know that we are all thinking of you.”

9. “We want to let you know that we are here for you if you need anything. Expect us to call you soon—you are welcome to come over whenever you want.”

10. 1″I know that _________ was well loved and respected. He had great character and a big heart.”

11. 1″Our sympathy is with you in your time of grieving.”

12. “Cheer up. Your (loved one who died) wouldn’t want you to be sad.”

13. “When you love deeply, you grieve deeply,” Heitger-Ewing writes. “Grievers need to be sad in order to get to the other side of grief.”

14. “Focus on all the blessings in your life.” (They are usually incapable of doing this.)

See Also: Famous And Popular Sayings

15. “She’s/he’s in a better place.” (The pain is still very real.)

16. “My deepest condolences to you and your family during this dark time. Please know that our family is keeping you and yours in our prayers and thoughts.”

17. “May all the sweet memories of ___________ bring you solace during this time. I hope that all the great moments that you were able to have with him/her before she/he passed away brings you comfort.”

18. “My heartfelt condolences to you during this time of sorrow. You’re in my thoughts and prayers and I’m here for whatever you need.”

19. “I hope the love and support from your loved ones bring you peace during this difficult time. My heartfelt sympathies to you.”

20. “There is no hurting, no suffering, and no pain in Heaven. While we grieve his/her physical loss, please be comforted by the fact that he/she is in a far better place now.”

21. “Extending my most heartfelt sympathy to you and your family.”

22. “I am at a loss for words. I know there is nothing for me to say that will make your loss easier but know that I am sending you my love and support. I hope you can understand what I can’t put into words.”

23. “Love knows no boundaries. While ________ is no longer physically with us, his/her spirit is always around us. My deepest condolences.”

24. “I have never been good at writing in cards, but I don’t want that to keep me from letting you know the deep sympathy I feel for you at this time.”

More Consoling Things to Say When Someone Dies

25. “Those who love us never go away. I hope you know that even during this dark time, __________ will always be with you in spirit.”

26. “The loss of someone dear to us is never easy. I hope all the cherished memories that you have of ________ brings you some light during this dark time. My deepest condolences.”

27. “Please know that you’re in my thoughts and prayers. My sincerest condolences for an incredibly great loss. I’ll never forget _________.”

28. “I was so saddened to hear about _________ passing. I hope and pray that you will have strength during this time of loss.”

29. “My deepest condolences to you during this time. Know that you are not alone and that if you ever need to talk, please don’t hesitate to reach out.”

30. “I can’t imagine how you’re feeling right now and I won’t pretend to know the loss that you’re experiencing. Please know that you’re not alone and I’m just a phone call away. If you ever need any support or someone to talk to, please don’t hesitate to reach out.”

See Also: Great Things To Say About Family

31. “I’ll bring you some lasagna next Tuesday.” (Or offer another specific way of helping.)

32. “Would you to talk about your loved one?”(People often want to talk about their loved one, but just need to be prompted.)

33. “How are you doing?” (Make sure you take time to listen to the response.)

34. “It’s been awhile since he/she died. It’s time you get over it.” (Never, ever say this.)

35. “Cherish all of the wonderful memories. They will bring you peace.” (Not particularly helpful.)

36. “Pull yourself together because you need to be there for your kids.” (Instead, you should offer to help with the kids.)

37. I feel your pain.” (Do not say, “I know exactly how you feel.”)

38. “How about a hug?” (Or just give them a hug.)

39. “I’m here for you.” (And then be there.)

40. “We all have to deal with loss”

41. “You shouldn’t feel this way”

42. I don’t know how you feel, but I am here to help in anyway I can.

43. You and your loved one will be in my thoughts and prayers.

44. Give a hug instead of saying something.

45. We all need help at times this, I am here for you.

46. I am usually up early or late, if you need anything.

47. Saying nothing, just be with the person.

48. “I can’t imagine what you’re going through right now.”

49. “At least his/her suffering is over”

50. “Things will be normal again soon”

Other Interesting Quotes For You

Wisdom Sayings and Life Quotes

Popular Common Sayings Everyone Should Know

Funny Quotes and Sayings

Get Well Sayings, Wishes, and Quotes 

Happy Sayings for Unforgettable Moments

Источник: https://chartcons.com/50-things-say-someone-dies/

REMEMBER THE MOON: When prayer is difficult, thought-send words of poetry to comfort a suicidal friend

Prayer When Word Is Difficult To Find

“Do not go gentle into that good night.” I thought this line, from poet Dylan Thomas, “at” a friend.

She’d posted this on :

At least a hundred replies arrived within 15 minutes. Friends sent love, reported dialing 911, asked for her phone number.

It was the end of the workday. I added my own “please stay strong” plea to the thread. Then I went to my desk. Thinking I was alone, I sobbed.

A coworker rushed in.

I explained. Not knowing what else to do, she asked if she could hug me. I said yes, although I don’t being physically touched when I’m sad. I understood her need to help, though, as I also felt it. I wanted to help my troubled friend, even though we hadn’t spoken in decades and lived thousands of miles apart.

John Donne wrote,

No man is an island … if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as any manner of thy friends or of thine

own were.

When people we’re connected to become lost, we ourselves feel lessened.

It can be difficult to pray in terrible situations

Prayer is supposed to help, but agnostics myself sometimes find praying awkward. Also, sometimes people don’t want prayers. After the 2015 Paris attacks, cartoonist Joann Sfar expressed a common sentiment, asking people not to pray for Paris because, “We don’t need more religion!”

After those attacks, even the Dalai Lama XIV said in a Deutsche Welle interview,

I am a Buddhist and I believe in praying. But humans have created this problem, and now we are asking God to solve it. It is illogical. God would say, solve it yourself because you created it in the first place.

This is true, but sometimes we’re unable to find solutions.

Someone reported that my friend had been taken to a hospital and was, for the moment, all right.

The next day, my friend posted a note that she was still suicidal. Then she posted that she wasn’t anymore. Then she disappeared.

An APB went out.

She was sighted by police.

She disappeared again.

Poetry as “secular prayer”

Poetry is sometimes referred to as “secular prayer.” Its words can be more soothing than spontaneous prayers. Poets might or might not tap into higher powers, but, being human, they tap into the collective consciousness of humanity.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

The Thomas poem, “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,” is often used to urge people to fight against illness. Since depression is an illness, I couldn’t stop thinking words from it “at” my friend. Doing so made me feel more connected to her than praying to a deity would’ve. For some, singing might do the same thing. Others might mentally send images.

I “thought-sent” image-based poems about nature to my suicidal friend, hoping she’d find solace in unexpected sightings during her journey.

These included the haiku written by Japanese Soto Zen master Ryokan, after thieves broke into his room:

The thief left it behind: the moon

at my window.

I also sent “A Cautionary” by my father, Dick Allen, a former poet laureate of Connecticut. On how to get through pain, he wrote,

You walk a little. You stop. You hurt.
And then you go on.

I whispered a W.B. Yeats piece that was pinned on a fence near the World Trade Center after the 9/11 attacks. Yeats asked that his words

Spread out their wings untiring, And never rest in their flight, Till they come where your sad, sad heart is,

And sing to you in the night.

Messages rising and flying birds

My friend, at last, posted a picture of herself safe. She’s now seeking treatment.

Did the poems I thought “at” her do any good? The skeptic in me says they most ly didn’t, although they helped me through my own anxiety about the situation.

I’m also enough of a believer in magical thinking, though, to let myself think that maybe, when joined with the words of others, they did help her.

I imagine our prayers, songs, images and whispered poems rising and flying to her birds.

I’m writing this piece as an excuse to physically send my friend the poems, in case they can be of actual help.

I’m also writing this for others who are worried about sick or endangered loved ones, or people who are acutely aware that, as said in the Maggie Smith poem “Good Bones” that went viral after the 2016 Orlando shootings,

Life is short and the world is at least half terrible.

The world is also half wonderful. There are always kind strangers, and all our voices are needed to join in song and send each other our love.

«RELATED READ» DEPRESSION & SUICIDE: Being mindful and accepting of the pain of the dark days»

image via Pexels

Источник: https://www.themindfulword.org/2017/poetry-comfort-suicidal-friend/

7 Steps to Prayer That Bring Results

Prayer When Word Is Difficult To Find

If you’ve been praying, but feel your prayers aren’t bringing results, there is an answer. Mark 11:24 says, “You can pray for anything, and if you believe that you’ve received it, it will be yours.” The Bible clearly defines the formula for this kind of successful prayer that is 100 percent effective.

You were meant to live a successful, overcoming Christian life. God has magnificent plans for you. He has set aside an inheritance of abundance for you to enjoy. But God’s will is not automatic. You have a part to play.

If you’re ready to experience a 100 percent success rate in prayer, here are the seven steps to prayer that bring results.

Step No. 1: Base Your Prayers on God’s Word
“This is the confidence we have in approaching God: that if we ask anything according to his will, he hears us. And if we know that he hears us—whatever we ask—we know that we have what we asked of him.” –1 John 5:14-15 (NIV)

The key to seeing the kind of results God wants you to achieve through prayer is not just shooting random arrows in the air, hoping something might happen. James wrote, “You do not have because you do not ask. You ask and do not receive, because you ask amiss” (James 4:3, NKJV). If you want to hit the bulls-eye every time you pray, your prayers must be the Word of God.

You can go boldly to the throne of grace (Hebrews 4:16), by knowing what God’s will is in advance and having it firmly fixed in your heart.

So, the first step to praying prayers that bring results is to locate the promise or promises that fit your situation in the Word of God. Then, an arrow to a bulls-eye, shoot that prayer with boldness and confidence.

This principle works in any area of prayer. Do you need healing in your body? Don’t pray what the doctor says or what religious tradition has taught you. Pray, “By His stripes I am healed” (see 1 Peter 2:24, KJV). Say, “Thank You, Lord, that You’ve provided healing for my body. Help me to receive it now. I thank You and praise You for it!”

Do you have a financial need? Don’t pray your problem—pray the answer! God has said He will provide for you, so pray, “Thank You, God, that You have said You will supply all my need according to Your riches in glory by Christ Jesus. I call in this promise now, in the Name of Jesus” (Philippians 4:19).

When you focus on the answer, it will activate your faith.

For more on effective prayer, try these 3 Prayer Secrets from Gloria Copeland.

Step No. 2: Submerge Your Prayers in Faith
“And whatever things you ask in prayer, believing, you will receive.” –Matthew 21:22 (NKJV)

Once you begin praying God’s Word, the next step in praying effectively is to submerge your prayers in faith. That means you don’t wait for a manifestation to believe you receive—that’s not faith!

This might seem difficult at first, but as you practice applying your faith, it will become a way of life for you. Here are some quick-start tips for adding faith to your prayers.

God’s Word is always true. If He says it’s done—it’s done. So, as you pray, begin to move yourself from believing He can to knowing He will.

Start your confession of faith before you see the manifestation of answers to your prayers. Then, hold fast to your confession without wavering. Don’t speak faith one day, then doubt the next. Hold on tightly; don’t let go; and no matter how tempting it might be, speak the Word only about your situation.

When the 10 lepers came to Jesus for healing, He told them to show themselves to the priests, and when they went, they were cleansed. They didn’t stand there and wait for Him to do something. They did exactly what He said do. They acted on His word. That is how you apply faith.

The same was true of the woman with the issue of blood. She acted on her faith when she reached out to touch His robe to take her healing. When faith was applied (acted on), results came.

Kenneth Copeland put these steps into practice when he lost his voice while preaching a long series of meetings in Jamaica. Instead of shutting down the meetings, he took these steps to submerge his prayers in faith.

First, he found the scriptures that promised him healing. Then, he applied his faith. He said, “Lord, if I were to ask my voice if I’m healed, it would say no. If I were to ask the people here if I’m healed, they’d say no.

But I’m not asking my body; I’ve asked Your WORD and I believe I receive it in the Name of Jesus.”

He didn’t see it, he didn’t feel it, but he knew it. He walked right back out to the pulpit and whispered into the microphone, praising God. His voice came back, and he kept right on preaching!

Every single time you act in faith with that kind of dogged determination on the Word of God, you will always wind up the winner.

Looking to strengthen your prayer life further? Find 7 Steps to a Deeper Prayer Life here.


Step No. 3: Stop Fear in Its Tracks

“For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war according to the flesh. For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal but mighty in God for pulling down strongholds.” –2 Corinthians 10:3-5 (NKJV)

Satan is a master trickster. But because he doesn’t have any real authority, he has to rely on the same old tactics. Mainly—fear.

Fear is debilitating. It will hinder your belief in God’s Word, it will stop you from receiving, and it will rob you of THE BLESSING. But Satan is wrong 100 percent of the time. Praise the Lord. He always is. He’s never told you the truth yet.

If you want to see results in your prayer life, fear and doubt can no longer be part of your vocabulary.

You don’t always need to say everything you think! And you certainly don’t need to say things you don’t mean. Jesus said, “Let your ‘Yes’ be ‘Yes’ and your ‘No’ be ‘No’” (Matthew 5:37, WEB).

  Anything outside of that stems from evil. Clean up your vocabulary and begin to talk the Word of God.

Refuse to allow doubt and fear to enter into your consciousness. The Bible says you have the ability to do so (2 Corinthians 10:3-5).

You can’t stop the devil from knocking on the door, but you sure don’t have to answer! Brother Hagin said, “I can’t keep the birds from flying over my head, but they sure don’t get to nest in my hair.”

Not only Satan, but even people will try to talk you your stand of faith—don’t listen! Say, “I refuse to doubt or fear. I am standing on the truth, and the truth makes me free!”

For more ways to strengthen your faith, try these 3 Ways to Overcome Unbelief.

“Then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.” –Joshua 1:8 (NKJV)

Part of having faith for prayer that brings results is seeing yourself succeeding and taking possession of what you’re believing for. Does this mean you see in the natural? No.

It means you see it with your spiritual eyes. When you can really see it, not just in your mind, but deep down in your spirit, it has become a reality to you—as real as a natural manifestation.

That’s the kind of believing prayer that brings results in the natural.

Dr. Bill Winston said it this way: “God told Abraham, ‘As far as you can see, I’ll give you.’ Until you see it, you’re not entitled to it. Without revelation there is no restoration. You’ve got to see it to have it.”

Part of seeing yourself succeeding is avoiding places, people and situations that talk failure. You can’t be around people who always talk about failing. It will eventually rub off on you.

Decide right now to succeed. Quit planning to fail. Don’t plan for a what-if. Plan for success, plan for victory, plan to receive everything you’re believing God for. Stretch your faith as far as it will go. “I can’t” should not be in your vocabulary.

Watch Gloria Copeland and Pastor George Pearsons, as they expand on this teaching about prayers that bring results.

Step No. 5: Testify That Your Prayer Is Answered
“And they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony.” –Revelation 12:11 (NKJV)

This verse tells us we overcome the plots and plans of the enemy two ways: by the blood of Jesus and by the word of our testimony (speaking it out). Everything you need has been provided by the blood of Jesus, and as a born-again believer, those things are rightfully yours.

But, we do have an enemy who is out to steal, kill and destroy our rights. Jesus already did His part in defeating him, and our part is simple—our words. You’ve taken a lot of steps to get to this point in achieving prayer that brings results. Don’t stop now!

When you testify to answered prayer, you achieve two things:

    1. You claim what is rightfully yours. You have the right to have anything the sacrifice of Jesus procured. When you testify to that right, it begins to take place in your life.
    2. Your testimony of faith will encourage others and help build their faith. That’s why Jesus told the man who had been demon-possessed to go home and tell his family everything the Lord had done for him (Mark 5:18-20).

Your testimony is a powerful tool in your prayer life.

Find out How to Meditate on the Word of God here.

Step No. 6: Get Involved Helping Someone Else
“The only thing that counts is faith expressing itself through love.” –Galatians 5:6 (NIV)

So far, we’ve learned that prayer that brings results is fueled by faith. And now, we see that faith works by love.

In other words, if we want our faith to be at a level that will bring results in our prayer life, we’ve got to express that faith through love to others.
Our faith is strengthened as we reach out to others.

So, if you’re standing and believing for something in prayer, get involved helping someone else. Tell someone else what Jesus has done for you.  When you do, all your problems will seem to fold up and roll away.

True prosperity is the ability to use the power of God to meet the needs of mankind in every realm of life—spirit, soul, body, financially and socially.

Step No. 7: Get on the Giving End“Give, and it will be given to you.” –Luke 6:38 (NIV)

If you want to be on the receiving end of prayer that brings results, start by getting in on the giving end.
What does that mean?

If you need healing, pray for someone else to be healed (James 5:16). The way you measure out is how it will be measured back. The Word says God is Love.

If you need your children to be more involved with God, go witness about salvation to someone else’s child.

  If you need more time, give what little you do have and ask God to redeem it for you—He’ll give it back in abundance. Walk in the light you have, and God will give you more.

Jesus said, “give and it will be given to you again.”
God is looking for someone He can use to become a channel of His blessings. The more He gives, the more you give. You can become a rich blessing of giving, not just receiving. If you’ll take the receiving end off your mind, and focus on giving, you’ll be in position for answered prayer.

In conclusion, when you determine to take these seven steps, your prayers will bring results every time. All you have to do is develop the kind of believing faith that receives all that Jesus did for you on the cross. You don’t have to struggle in your prayer closet anymore. Go boldly to the throne of grace!

Related Articles:

How to Meditate on the Word of God

Meditate on the Word to Battle Stress

© 1997 – 2019 Eagle Mountain International Church Inc. Aka Kenneth Copeland Ministries. All Rights Reserved.

Источник: https://blog.kcm.org/7-steps-prayer-bring-results/

25 Ways to Improve Your Writing Vocabulary

Prayer When Word Is Difficult To Find

A great vocabulary is just one essential tool in a writer’s toolbox, along with punctuation, grammar, and many others. Vocabulary can make your writing more powerful and more effective and help you say exactly what you mean. This indispensable tool will help you choose the best word for every job and avoid vague words that do not give your readers a good sense of your meaning.

Building your vocabulary is one of the easiest ways to improve the power of your writing and make any writing task that much easier, as you will have several synonyms in your repertoire to pull from every time. Developing your vocabulary need not be difficult or painful. Here are 25 ways you can improve your writing vocabulary every day.

Use New Words

Use a word immediately after you learn it. Try to make a game using a new word as soon as you learn it. Every day, try to slip in a new word into the conversation, a journal entry, an assignment or an email to a friend. Do this as often as possible, and repeat the word to yourself.

Read Every Day

Once you’re school, word drills and assigned reading become things of the past. While these were tools for building your vocabulary repertoire while you were young, it doesn’t mean you should abandon reading.

Try to read a well-written and edited essay, magazine article, book or news article every day.

Nonfiction and technical books will quickly teach you new ways to think and speak with words you may be unfamiliar with, but any type of reading will help you along.

Learn Roots

Learn the roots of words. Most words in the English language are built from a common root, prefix, and suffix, usually with an origin in the Greek or Latin language. Once you learn a root, you’ll begin to understand more words that use the same root. For example, -duc- (Latin root word) means to lead or to make, such as in the words produce or deduce.

Use a Thesaurus

Keep a thesaurus handy. As you write, keep a thesaurus handy and use it when you find yourself using a word too often, or using a word that you know doesn’t quite convey the right meaning. This will help you better express yourself, and you’ll also learn a new word in the process.

Develop Practical Vocabulary

This means you should start by learning words that express what’s important to you for the task at hand. A good example of this is learning trade language or words you use often in a hobby or vocation. Rather than immediately turning to cliches or jargon that’s tossed around, look for clearer words to express to peers what you’re writing about.

Learn New Words Every Day

To improve your vocabulary quickly, make an effort to learn at least one new word every single day. There are plenty of ways to do this, such as a Word of the Day calendar or email list, or simply picking a word from a thesaurus or dictionary.

Look up Words You Don’t Know

How often do you come across words that are unfamiliar as you read? Don’t just gloss over them; take the time to look them up, and if you don’t have the time right then, write them down and look them up later.

Keep a Journal

Journaling won’t just help you develop your writing style, it will also help you improve your vocabulary. Try to use new or interesting words you’ve learned recently into a journal entry for the day or the week.

Identify Empty Words

You’re probably familiar with empty words in your speech (such as “uh” or “um”), but your writing probably has empty words as well.

Look for these empty words in your writing that do not offer any substance to your reader and replace them with something more appropriate.

The same principle applies to phrases and sentences, so make sure that you haven’t used six or seven phrases to say something that could be better communicated in one sentence filled with carefully-chosen words.

Diversify Your Reading List

If you tend to read the same sort of things day in and day out, you may not be exposing yourself to a wide enough range of vocabulary. Diversify the topics you read to include natural science, Shakespeare, contemporary literature, politics, history, philosophy or any other topics you think you may enjoy.

Do Word Puzzles

Word puzzles in the newspaper or a magazine aren’t just a fun way to fill time, they’re also perfect for boosting your working vocabulary.

Crossword puzzles are a challenge that get your brain working hard to search your memory for words you do know but don’t use, and this can help you move words from your memory banks into your working set of vocabulary which will come across in your writing.

Try Word Board Games

There are plenty of word games on the market designed to improve vocabulary and language skills without being a bore. Some of these games you may have played as a child, so it’s time to break them out again and get to “work.” If you have a friend who could also use some help — or someone with a great vocabulary you think will challenge you — invite them over for a game night.

Practice New Words in Divergent Ways

It takes between 10 and 20 repetitions to make a new word a part of your vocabulary. To help the word settle into your mind and memory, write it down (both the definition and a sentence you make up using the word), use it in conversation, include it in an email or any other way you can think of.

Make up Associations

Start by saying the new word aloud, then relate it to a word you already know. A good example of this is gargantuan, which means “very large” or “gigantic.” Say a sequence aloud: small, medium, large, very large, gargantuan. Then list things you think are gargantuan.

Use Mnemonics

Mnemonic techniques are memory tricks you can use to remember new words. You may remember a word by sounding it out and thinking of a funny sentence that matches the meaning, such as turning egregious (extremely bad) into “Don’t let that smelly rotten egg reach us!”

Visualize New Words

Research shows that visualization is a great way to remember new words and their meanings. A good example of this is the word stratovolcano, which is a high, pointed mountain with a violent explosion.

One way to remember this meaning is the fact that the prefix “strato” sounds “straight-oh,” which may make you think of a straight ruler or a “straight-o-volcano,” which describes the word’s definition.

Make Your Own Vocabulary Tests

Keep a list of the new words you learn each week and incorporate into writing and conversation. At the end of each week, make yourself a quiz using the words to cement them in your memory.

Make Synonym Word Lists

Do you find yourself turning to the same word again and again in your writing? Grab a piece of paper and write it at the top. Next, brainstorm or use a thesaurus to generate a list of ten to twenty new words you can use instead. You can keep these lists in a vocabulary notebook and add to them whenever you learn a new synonym.

Take a Writing Course

There are plenty of online courses as well as in-person classes you can attend to boost your writing vocabulary and learn how to use new words correctly.

Try to find a self-paced course that uses assignments and quizzes to hep you increase fluency and brush up on your writing skills.

Some classes are aimed at essay writing or creative writing, so you can find a class that will help you improve the style you need the most help with.

Edit Your Own Writing

After you finish writing, be your own editor and go though the piece with a fine-toothed comb to identify overused and nondescript words with something more precise or colorful.

Editing is an important process for spotting writing errors, but it’s also great for improving the tone, style, and clarity of your writing. It might help to read the sentences aloud, then note any lack of precision.

Search through your memory for more descriptive words, or consult a thesaurus if you need to.

As you replace words, remember that using a large number of complex words won’t necessarily clarify the meaning, and it may just make your writing more pompous. Ask yourself, “Do I know a better word to use instead?” You may replace “use” with “acquire” or “obtain,” or “do” with “perform.”

Move Words from Comprehensive to Expressive Vocabulary

You actually have two types of vocabulary: one is a much larger set of words you understand, even if only vaguely, and the other is a smaller set of words you actually use to express yourself.

Moving words from your comprehensive, but passive vocabulary, to your active, expressive vocabulary is easier than you think. To do this, you’ll need to know how to define, pronounce and spell the words.

Say them out loud and use them at every opportunity to move them into your active set.

Ask for Feedback

Do you think your writing could use some help? If you’re struggling with your written vocabulary, try asking someone else for help. A second set of eyes can offer a great deal of insight and spot problems you may not notice yourself, including poor word choice. Don’t be afraid to ask a friend, teacher, co-worker or someone online to review your writing for feedback on your vocabulary.

Carry a Dictionary and Thesaurus with You

How often do you find yourself with free time and nothing to do? Carry a pocket thesaurus or dictionary with you and you’ll find time to beef up your vocabulary while you’re waiting for an appointment, commuting to work or waiting for a bus.

Whenever you have a few minutes to spare, read a page or two and learn a new word to add to your writing. It’s also a great idea to look up obscure words you don’t quite grasp that come to you on the fly as you go about your day.

You can also use the dictionary or thesaurus to look up unfamiliar words you come across in your daily life.

Use College Preparation Tests

College prep tests that use SAT and ACT-type words are a great way to take your writing to the next level.

This form of advanced study will challenge your mind and give you a new set of words to use that are practical and offer your writing the clarity it needs.

You’ll also get the chance to brush up on the most important Latin and Greek roots and get a new set of words with activities to help move them into your active vocabulary set.

Play Games

There are tons of non-board games that will help you improve your writing vocabulary while you have fun. Try downloading fun word games onto your phone or computer so you can get some practice while you unwind after a busy day.

Some games are designed to build vocabulary skills, but there are plenty of others that will help you practice spelling, phonics, and even typing skills.

There are even some designed for college students to prepare for testing and vocabulary-rich exams.

Hopefully, this list has given you an excellent place to start to build your vocabulary a bit at a time.

If you think about it, there are opportunities all around you to develop this important skill, so spend time every day reading and listening to take in new words and then develop a system to incorporate these new words in your writing and speech.

Before long, you’ll find your vocabulary has grown to a new level and your writing has gained the clarity you need with an ease you didn’t think possible.

Author Bio: Jovell Alingod is a Project Manager for eReflect – maker of Ultimate Vocabulary, a software for vocabulary improvement with tens of thousands of happy customers in over 110 countries.

(Image courtesy of Michael Coghlan)

Источник: https://wordcounter.net/blog/2014/01/22/1027_25-ways-to-improve-your-writing-vocabulary.html

When Prayer is Difficult

Prayer When Word Is Difficult To Find

I appeal to you, brothers, by our Lord Jesus Christ and by the love of the Spirit, to strive together with me in your prayers to God on my behalf. (Romans 15:30)

In my Christian life, I have found that prayer is a difficult discipline. And I concur with others that praying moves through different seasons. My posture may change, my prayers may change.

But whatever season I am currently facing, my specific prayers are often marked by experiences. If I am doubting, I pray for faith. If I’m hurting, I pray for healing.

If I lack wisdom, I ask God to give me discernment. If this true for you, we are together in the difficult discipline of prayer, for I am no saint when it comes to fervency of prayer.

Prayer is a lagging discipline that needs constant shoring up.

The Difficulty of Prayer

Prayer is a spiritual discipline that needs cultivation. The ground needs to be turned over. Seeds need to be planted and watered. We wait the farmer, trusting the seed will sprout and multiply its blessing.

Prayer takes effort and constant fine-tuning. We learn to pray. We learn what not to say. At one point, Paul commended Epaphras on his fervent prayer life, calling him a struggler in prayer: “Epaphras greets you, always struggling on your behalf in his prayers” (Colossians 4:12). I this descriptor that the apostle uses—prayer is indeed a struggle.

The great theologian and pastor Martyn Lloyd-Jones once commented on the struggle of prayer. He said,

When a man is speaking to God he is at his very acme. It is the highest activity of the human soul, and therefore it is at the same time the ultimate test of a man’s true spiritual condition. There is nothing that tells the truth about us as Christian people so much as our prayer life.¹

Paul, wise, shared his personal struggle. He said, “Brothers, my heart’s desire and prayer to God for them is that they may be saved” (Romans 10:1). Paul’s intense passion for lost people is evident here, and the struggle to pray evangelistically is clearly identified by his words.

Three Reasons Prayer Is Difficult

I believe there are at least three main culprits that inhibit true fervency in prayer.

1. Our flesh is weak (Matthew 26:41)

We have difficulty suppressing physical tiredness and challenges. Perhaps there are days when our mind grows tired. Or we’re physically exhausted from work, from our children, and possibly from weakness due to an illness.

I find that physical weakness is often connected to spiritual weakness (though not always connected). For when the body is weak, our minds can think wrong thoughts about God, and our hearts can begin to believe these thoughts. Prayer time can become ineffective because our minds are distracted and wander to different themes.

I’ve caught myself falling asleep the disciples. In these moments of lapse, I awake and find myself embarrassed or troubled in spirit that I did not labor in prayer. So I pray, “Lord strengthen my body and mind to pray.” Remember that even simple prayers can be launching pads for effective, fervent prayers to the Lord. 

We sometimes encounter seasons where faith is diminished. Seasons of pain and trials can be factors in a diminished faith. Unanswered prayer can be difficult to understand. When God’s promises go unanswered, we wonder if he is even listening to our requests.

Believer, during seasons of unanswered prayer, remember that God hears you. He is at work. We must fight to believe and trust the Lord, even when we cannot see him at work. “God, help my unbelief” is a simple prayer to say. Sometimes, we have no ornate or theological verbiage to pray. Simple and sweet. Straightforward and honest. So we fight weariness with prayer. 

Spiritual challenges in other people also keep us from praying effectively. People’s burdens can be difficult to manage alone.

I’ve found that small groups, Bible study groups, and other discipleship groups are great opportunities for believers to pray together. Burden-sharing builds unity and lightens the load. Still, the burdens can be unbearable, and we need the Lord’s help.

I’m thankful for Romans 8 that says the “Spirit bears witness with my spirit,” for he speaks on behalf of our inability (Romans 8:26-27).

3. Our pattern is wrong (Matthew 6:7)

Sometimes, we approach prayer with the wrong pattern. We spend more time focusing on personal needs than addressing “our Father who is in heaven.” God is to be glorified. He is to be adorned, and he is to be worshiped. 

Following a pattern for prayer is helpful and keeps us from becoming distracted by a personal wish list. Patterns direct our thoughts back to God. For the disciples, prayer was a difficult discipline that needed refinement.

They grasped their need to pattern their prayers, so they watched Jesus pray. The Teacher provides them (and us) a helpful pattern to be modeled and exercised.

[attention type=red]
Read through The Lord’s Prayer in Matthew 6 and notice how God is exalted, sins are confessed, and needs expressed.
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There are contemporary models that can serve as tools for your prayer life, Adoration, Confession, Thanksgiving, and Supplication (ACTS). Or you can simply walk through the Lord’s Prayer by reflecting line-by-line on its main features and applying them specifically to your prayers.

How to Pray Effective Prayers

Why not start with praying Scripture as a simple way to cultivate fervency and effectiveness in prayer? While reading through my Bible, my motivation to pray earnestly grows. Maybe read one verse or passage each day, respond in prayer, and repeat as needed. Here are several starting places:

Praying for needs is also effective when a person knows exactly what to pray for. Churches can manage and store prayers, develop a prayer list in their bulletins, and send prayer requests through emails. Individuals can collect prayer needs on a list, praying through it and updating it regularly. (It’s important for us to keep our lists up-to-date and to follow up with people.)

There will be seasons when prayer lacks intensity or fervency. It may be right now that you are experiencing prayer’s greatest fight. How about returning to prayer today, by the strength God supplies? He helps you, and he hears you.

[1] Martin Lloyd-Jones, Sermon on the Mount, 2 vols., pp. 2: 46. Photo Credit: Lightstock]

This article originally appeared on UnlockingTheBible.org. Used with permission. 

Dr. Joel Badal is married to Lisa. They have four children and reside in Chicago, Illinois.

Joel completed a Master of Divinity and Doctorate of Philosophy, and he currently serves as Dean of Educational Services & Institutional Effectiveness and is the Professor of Leadership, Management & Education at Crossroads Bible College.

His marriage, family, ministry, and education have been instrumental to shaping his theology, his commitment to the church, and his application of leadership.

Image courtesy: ©Thinkstock/ipopba

Publication date: June 7, 2017

Источник: https://www.crosswalk.com/faith/prayer/when-prayer-is-difficult.html

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