Prayer For My Girlfriend’s Depression

Powerful Prayers for Depression [Quotes & Verses]

Prayer For My Girlfriend’s Depression

The feeling of worth is so powerful. Without the feeling of worth, one can begin to feel hopeless. When one feels hopeless, they want an escape. When one attempts to escape their life, they shut down and become prisoner to their negative thoughts and loneliness.

Depression is a physical, mental and spiritual condition. It is characterized by the consistent feeling of hopelessness and joylessness. It can come in a dark and dense cloud; its spirit of heaviness can weigh one down.

One of the ways to help prevent someone from falling down this slippery slope of depression is by going your way to make sure others in your community feel their worth.

The good Word of God paired with your own good word can be enough to change the outlook or condition of a troubled heart for the better. Practice compassion and make people feel they are important, they are loved and they are enough.

We all seek these fundamental needs; these desires were planted in our hearts by God.

Proverbs 12:25- Anxiety in a man’s heart weighs it down (depression), but a good word cheers it up.  

If you come across someone and see that they are struggling or having a tough time, offer them your support and encouragement. You don’t even need to worry about coming up with the most motivating and poetic thing to say to them.

It can be as simple and heartfelt as an embrace and telling them these three words, “You are enough.” Sharing these simple messages of affirmation has so much impact.

Compassion and love is what can make someone escape their hole and get back their life.

Unfortunately over the years, society has developed this stigma surrounding mental illnesses and depression that has done our community a huge disservice. This negative stigma inevitably pushes people suffering from depression away from seeking the help they need. It’s a double-edged sword.

Depression is often viewed as a weakness that can be remedied with an attitude adjustment. But in reality, it is more than just a slump or a period of sadness. There are some people who truly have mental illnesses. There are some people that have chemical imbalances in their brains and it’s not their fault.

It can stem from their upbringing, their influences or just simply a bad luck of the draw.
Mental illness and depression is not a choice. It is something that occurs over time. If you or someone you know is struggling with depression, seek professional help immediately.

There is absolutely no shame in receiving help.

Psalm 31:22,24 – You heard my cry for mercy when I called to you for help… Be strong and take heart, all you who hope in the Lord.

Everybody has that time where they hit rock bottom. It could be anything such as a bankruptcy, a divorce or a death of a loved one. Life happens to all of us at one point or another.

You may feel you have hit a wall and life has you pinned down to the ground. You are lying flat on the ground and all you can do is look up. You feel stuck.

You feel paralyzed as you look up and see all the things you want, hope and desire just pass you by.

Psalm 34:18, 19 – The LORD is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit. (19) A righteous man may have many troubles, but the Lord delivers him from them all.

You lie there, and the decision is do you stand up and start fighting for those things you want, hope and desire? Or do you continue to lie there and stare at all the things you want, hope and desire?

There is no one else that can do anything for you. The only thing that is capable of destroying the cause, process and effects of depression is God’s hope and his word of hope.

The solution is to get God’s hope back inside of you. His hope will give you the clarity to once again see all the possibilities for your future.

Hope also gives you the motivation to take action and the encouragement to stay on the road to faith and joy.

God’s deliverance can set you free. However, it is in your responsibility to fight for your continued deliverance. You must make the decision; are you going to lie there on the ground and keep dreaming or stand up and start taking action?

The second you stand up is the second that you succeed. The second you stand up is right when you become the hero.  Whatever happens to you next is part of the journey of being a hero. You are your own hero the second you stand up.

Experience the glorious freedom and joy that God has for you. You have the power to succeed and you have the power to stand up. You have the power to achieve and make things happen.

Even if you “fail” and things don’t work out the way you expected, it’s okay. Why? Because the worth is in the journey. The worth is in standing up. The worth is in the exploration.

The worth isn’t necessarily in the outcome.

Psalm 37:23-24 – If the Lord delights in a man’s way, he makes his steps firm; though he stumbles, he will not fall, for the Lord upholds him with his hand.

So, how do you make a shift in your life? How do you make this change?

Stand up and start taking action. Fight for God’s outlook with all you have. Be your own hero.

Believe in the bible for it holds the mind and ways of God. Read scriptures and verses that resonate with you and inspire you. Meditate on them. Then say some of the prayers below or have your own conversation with God.

Within this freedom you will find more healing, deeper conversations with your soul and more clarity on the purpose of your existence. Stay steadfastly focused on the Lord and you will find peace and brighter days. You are important and you have value. You are not alone.

Isaiah 26:3-4, Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Thee: because he trusts in Thee. Trust ye in the LORD forever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is everlasting strength.

Psalm 126:5 – Those who sow in tears will reap with songs of joy.

Uplift My Thoughts:

Dear God, I come to you in my hour of need. I ask you to touch my mind and uplift my thoughts, change my seeming realities that I’m thinking about my life, change my opinion of what is and what can be.

God, I ask that you to give me a sense of well being again. I pray that you help me find my smile, both on my face and in my soul. God I cannot do this by myself, so I turn to you, and I surrender.

In Jesus Christ’s name, Amen.

Disturbed Prayer

O Christ Jesus, when all is darkness and we feel our weakness and helplessness, give us the sense of your presence, your love, and your strength. Help us to have perfect trust in your protecting love and strengthening power, so that nothing may frighten or worry us, for, living close to you, we shall see your hand,

your purpose, your will through all things.

-St. Ignatius of Loyola 

Lift Me Up

Dear God, I pray that you will lift me up. Lift me up so I can get on with my life.

I do not know where to turn, God, so I ask you to work through me and to attract to me a life that will be everything that I need for sustained happiness and fulfillment.

I may not know what that is, God, but I trust that you do and that gives me hope. It also gives me hope that you can come through me, touch me, and uplift me.

I give thanks, God, that this is now occurring in my life, and I decree that it is so.

In Jesus Christ’s name, Amen.

Heal Hurt Feelings

Dear God, I pray that you will help me get beyond feeling weighed down by the burden of hurt feelings of the past. Help me to get beyond yesterday’s upset thoughts. I pray for healing.  I know that nothing can withstand the healing power of God’s love.  I open my heart to God’s love, and I bask in the glow of Divine light and understanding. 

I pray for healing in God’s love today. 

In Jesus Christ’s name, Amen.

Release Feelings of Sadness

Dear God,I release all concerns and pray that with your help, all gloominess will be removed.

  I release feelings of sadness, feel your powerful presence enfold me, and give thanks for your good that is governing every situation in my life.

I willingly let go and let God because I know that each time I do, I am opening the door to endless possibilities and complete joy.  Help me lift my thoughts, Dear God, and feel the assurance of your presence. 

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Help Me Move Forward, God

Dear God,I ask you to help me cast out feelings of hopelessness, sadness, and frustration and help me move forward.  I know you are beside me.  I feel your surrounding comfort, understanding, and unconditional love, wrapping around me, a blanket, calming my fears and lightening my heart.  Thank you, Dear God, for always being there for me and with me, each and every day. 

I pray that I am able to release the sadness I feel and enjoy the adventure of the journey. 

In Jesus Christ’s name, Amen.

From Depression To Joy

Dear God, I pray that I live my life in joy. Whatever is keeping me from the full expression of joy; I pray that it is spiritually removed, or that I can look beyond it, to discover the true beauty in my life. I want to live more; I want to expand my awareness; I want to live in joy. Help me dear God to realize this now. 

Thank You, God.

In Jesus Christ’s name, Amen.

From Depression to Peace

Dear God, Beginning now, I no longer feel depressed. My depressed mood is cast out and replaced with your peace. Tranquility permeates my being, soothing my emotions and filling my mind and heart with joyous serenity.

I accept your gift of peace.  I come to you, Dear God, and my mood is lifted.  I fully accept your peaceful presence, and I feel calm.  This moment is holy, for in this moment, I enter into your spirit of peace.

  Thank you, dear God, for helping me to elevate my mood.

Thank you God for your priceless gift of peace. I will cherish it, and I promise to share it with others. 

In Jesus Christ’s name, Amen.

Prayer for Those Coping With Depression

Dear Lord, you are our refuge in good and in bad times. In your infinite mercy, bring peace and comfort to those of us who face days sometimes filled with pain and depression. Help us to realize that through you there is joy and the promise of lasting peace.

Help us through the rough times. Walk before and beside us so that we may walk in your footsteps and reach out to you in our journey on this earth. Help us to focus on our blessings rather than our misfortunes, dear Lord. Thank you for hearing and answering our prayers.

Amen

Verses:

Deuteronomy 31:8 – The Lord himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged.

Psalm 145:14 – The LORD upholds all those who fall and lifts up all who are bowed down.

Psalm 62:5 – Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him.

Isaiah 35:10 – And the ransomed of the Lord will return. They will enter Zion with singing; everlasting joy will crown their heads. Gladness and joy will overtake them, and sorrow and sighing will flee away

Isaiah 40:31, But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.

Isaiah 53:4 – Surely he took up our sicknesses and carried our sorrows.

Mark 9:23 – Everything is possible for him who believes.

Romans 15:13 – May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Philippians 4:6-7 – Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Psalm 147:3 – He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds.

Psalm 143:7-8 – Answer me quickly, O Lord; my spirit fails. Do not hide your face from me or I will be those who go down to the pit. Let the morning bring me word of your unfailing love, for I have put my trust in you. Show me the way I should go, for to you I’ll lift up my soul.

Psalms 9:9 – The Lord is a refuge for the oppressed, a stronghold in times of trouble.

Источник: https://www.holylandprayer.com/prayer_for/prayers-for-depression/

Helping Someone with Depression – HelpGuide.org

Prayer For My Girlfriend’s Depression

Depression is a serious but treatable disorder that affects millions of people, from young to old and from all walks of life. It gets in the way of everyday life, causing tremendous pain, hurting not just those suffering from it but also impacting everyone around them.

If someone you love is depressed, you may be experiencing any number of difficult emotions, including helplessness, frustration, anger, fear, guilt, and sadness. These feelings are all normal. It’s not easy dealing with a friend or family member’s depression. And if you neglect your own health, it can become overwhelming.

That said, your companionship and support can be crucial to your loved one’s recovery. You can help them to cope with depressions symptoms, overcome negative thoughts, and regain their energy, optimism, and enjoyment of life.

Start by learning all you can about depression and how to best talk about it with your friend or family member.

But as you reach out, don’t forget to look after your own emotional health—you’ll need it to provide the full support your loved one needs.

Depression is a serious condition. Don’t underestimate the seriousness of depression. Depression drains a person’s energy, optimism, and motivation. Your depressed loved one can’t just “snap it” by sheer force of will.

The symptoms of depression aren’t personal. Depression makes it difficult for a person to connect on a deep emotional level with anyone, even the people they love the most. It’s also common for depressed people to say hurtful things and lash out in anger. Remember that this is the depression talking, not your loved one, so try not to take it personally.

Hiding the problem won’t make it go away. It doesn’t help anyone involved if you try making excuses, covering up the problem, or lying for a friend or family member who is depressed. In fact, this may keep the depressed person from seeking treatment.

Your loved one isn’t lazy or unmotivated. When you’re suffering from depression, just thinking about doing the things that may help you to feel better can seem exhausting or impossible to put into action. Have patience as you encourage your loved one to take the first small steps to recovery.

You can’t “fix” someone else’s depression. As much as you may want to, you can’t rescue someone from depression nor fix the problem for them. You’re not to blame for your loved one’s depression or responsible for their happiness (or lack thereof). While you can offer love and support, ultimately recovery is in the hands of the depressed person.

Recognizing depression symptoms in a loved one

Family and friends are often the first line of defense in the fight against depression. That’s why it’s important to understand the signs and symptoms of depression. You may notice the problem in a depressed loved one before they do, and your influence and concern can motivate them to seek help.

Be concerned if your loved one…

Doesn’t seem to care about anything anymore. Has lost interest in work, sex, hobbies, and other pleasurable activities. Has withdrawn from friends, family, and other social activities.

Expresses a bleak or negative outlook on life. Is uncharacteristically sad, irritable, short-tempered, critical, or moody; talks about feeling “helpless” or “hopeless.”

Frequently complains of aches and pains such as headaches, stomach problems, and back pain. Or complains of feeling tired and drained all the time.

Sleeps less than usual or oversleeps. Has become indecisive, forgetful, disorganized, and “ it.”

Eats more or less than usual, and has recently gained or lost weight.

Drinks more or abuses drugs, including prescription sleeping pills and painkillers.

How to talk to someone about depression

Sometimes it is hard to know what to say when speaking to someone about depression. You might fear that if you bring up your worries the person will get angry, feel insulted, or ignore your concerns. You may be unsure what questions to ask or how to be supportive.

If you don’t know where to start, the following suggestions may help. But remember that being a compassionate listener is much more important than giving advice.

You don’t have to try to “fix” your friend or family member; you just have to be a good listener. Often, the simple act of talking  face to face can be an enormous help to someone suffering from depression.

Encourage the depressed person to talk about their feelings, and be willing to listen without judgment.

Don’t expect a single conversation to be the end of it. Depressed people tend to withdraw from others and isolate themselves. You may need to express your concern and willingness to listen over and over again. Be gentle, yet persistent.

Ways to start the conversation:

“I have been feeling concerned about you lately.”

“Recently, I have noticed some differences in you and wondered how you are doing.”

“I wanted to check in with you because you have seemed pretty down lately.”

Questions you can ask:

“When did you begin feeling this?”

“Did something happen that made you start feeling this way?”

“How can I best support you right now?”

“Have you thought about getting help?”

Remember, being supportive involves offering encouragement and hope. Very often, this is a matter of talking to the person in language that they will understand and can respond to while in a depressed state of mind.

Tips for Talking about Depression
What you CAN say that helps:
  • “You are not alone in this. I’m here for you.”
  • “You may not believe it now, but the way you’re feeling will change.”
  • “I may not be able to understand exactly how you feel, but I care about you and want to help.”
  • “When you want to give up, tell yourself you will hold on for just one more day, hour, minute—whatever you can manage.”
  • “You are important to me. Your life is important to me.”
  • “Tell me what I can do now to help you.”
What you should AVOID saying:
  • “It’s all in your head”
  • “We all go through times this.”
  • “Look on the bright side.”
  • “You have so much to live for, why do you want to die?”
  • “I can’t do anything about your situation.”
  • “Just snap it.”
  • “What’s wrong with you?”
  • “Shouldn’t you be better by now?”
Source: The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

The risk of suicide is real

If you believe your loved one is at an immediate risk for suicide, do NOT leave them alone.

In the U.S., dial 911 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK.

In other countries, call your country’s emergency services number or visit IASP to find a suicide prevention helpline.

It may be hard to believe that the person you know and love would ever consider something as drastic as suicide, but a depressed person may not see any other way out. Depression clouds judgment and distorts thinking, causing a normally rational person to believe that death is the only way to end the pain they’re feeling.

Since suicide is a very real danger when someone is depressed, it’s important to know the warning signs:

  • Talking about suicide, dying, or harming oneself; a preoccupation with death
  • Expressing feelings of hopelessness or self-hate
  • Acting in dangerous or self-destructive ways
  • Getting affairs in order and saying goodbye
  • Seeking out pills, weapons, or other lethal objects
  • A sudden sense of calm after depression

If you think a friend or family member might be considering suicide, don’t wait, talk to them about your concerns.

Many people feel uncomfortable bringing up the topic but it is one of the best things you can do for someone who is thinking about suicide.

Talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a person’s life, so speak up if you’re concerned and seek professional help immediately!

Encouraging the person to get help

While you can’t control someone else’s recovery from depression, you can start by encouraging the depressed person to seek help. Getting a depressed person into treatment can be difficult.

Depression saps energy and motivation, so even the act of making an appointment or finding a doctor can seem daunting to your loved one. Depression also involves negative ways of thinking.

The depressed person may believe that the situation is hopeless and treatment pointless.

Because of these obstacles, getting your loved one to admit to the problem—and helping them see that it can be solved—is an essential step in depression recovery.

If your friend or family member resists getting help:

Suggest a general check-up with a physician. Your loved one may be less anxious about seeing a family doctor than a mental health professional.

A regular doctor’s visit is actually a great option, since the doctor can rule out medical causes of depression. If the doctor diagnoses depression, they can refer your loved one to a psychiatrist or psychologist.

Sometimes, this “professional” opinion makes all the difference.

Offer to help the depressed person find a doctor or therapist and go with them on the first visit. Finding the right treatment provider can be difficult, and is often a trial-and-error process. For a depressed person already low on energy, it is a huge help to have assistance making calls and looking into the options.

Encourage your loved one to make a thorough list of symptoms and ailments to discuss with the doctor. You can even bring up things that you have noticed as an outside observer, such as, “You seem to feel much worse in the mornings,” or “You always get stomach pains before work.”

Supporting your loved one’s treatment

One of the most important things you can do to help a friend or relative with depression is to give your unconditional love and support throughout the treatment process.

This involves being compassionate and patient, which is not always easy when dealing with the negativity, hostility, and moodiness that go hand in hand with depression.

Provide whatever assistance the person needs (and is willing to accept).

Help your loved one make and keep appointments, research treatment options, and stay on schedule with any treatment prescribed.

Have realistic expectations. It can be frustrating to watch a depressed friend or family member struggle, especially if progress is slow or stalled. Having patience is important. Even with optimal treatment, recovery from depression doesn’t happen overnight.

Lead by example. Encourage the person to lead a healthier, mood-boosting lifestyle by doing it yourself: maintain a positive outlook, eat better, avoid alcohol and drugs, exercise, and lean on others for support.

Encourage activity. Invite your loved one to join you in uplifting activities, going to a funny movie or having dinner at a favorite restaurant. Exercise is especially helpful, so try to get your depressed loved one moving. Going on walks together is one of the easiest options. Be gently and lovingly persistent—don’t get discouraged or stop asking.

Pitch in when possible. Seemingly small tasks can be very hard for someone with depression to manage. Offer to help out with household responsibilities or chores, but only do what you can without getting burned out yourself!

Taking care of yourself

There’s a natural impulse to want to fix the problems of people we care about, but you can’t control someone else’s depression. You can, however, control how well you take care of yourself. It’s just as important for you to stay healthy as it is for the depressed person to get treatment, so make your own well-being a priority.

Remember the advice of airline flight attendants: put on your own oxygen mask before you assist anyone else.

In other words, make sure your own health and happiness are solid before you try to help someone who is depressed.

You won’t do your friend or family member any good if you collapse under the pressure of trying to help. When your own needs are taken care of, you’ll have the energy you need to lend a helping hand.

Speak up for yourself. You may be hesitant to speak out when the depressed person in your life upsets you or lets you down. However, honest communication will actually help the relationship in the long run.

If you’re suffering in silence and letting resentment build, your loved one will pick up on these negative emotions and feel even worse.

Gently talk about how you’re feeling before pent-up emotions make it too hard to communicate with sensitivity.

Set boundaries. Of course you want to help, but you can only do so much. Your own health will suffer if you let your life be controlled by your loved one’s depression.

You can’t be a caretaker round the clock without paying a psychological price. To avoid burnout and resentment, set clear limits on what you are willing and able to do.

You are not your loved one’s therapist, so don’t take on that responsibility.

Stay on track with your own life. While some changes in your daily routine may be unavoidable while caring for your friend or relative, do your best to keep appointments and plans with friends. If your depressed loved one is unable to go on an outing or trip you had planned, ask a friend to join you instead.

Seek support. You are NOT betraying your depressed relative or friend by turning to others for support. Joining a support group, talking to a counselor or clergyman, or confiding in a trusted friend will help you get through this tough time.

You don’t need to go into detail about your loved one’s depression or betray confidences; instead focus on your emotions and what you are feeling.

Make sure you can be totally honest with the person you turn to—choose someone who will listen without interruption and without judging you.

Authors: Melinda Smith, M.A., Lawrence Robinson, and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D. Last updated: June 2019.

Источник: https://www.helpguide.org/articles/depression/helping-someone-with-depression.htm

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