Prayer For All Who Show God’s Mercy

Divine Mercy | Facts, Resources and Prayers

Prayer For All Who Show God’s Mercy

Faustina was asked by her spiritual director and confessor to ask Jesus what the blue and red rays meant.
“During prayer I heard these words within me: The two rays denote Blood and Water. The pale ray stands for the Water which makes souls righteous.

The red ray stands for the Blood which is the life of souls…These two rays issued forth from the very depths of My tender mercy when My agonized Heart was opened by a lance on the Cross. These rays shield souls from the wrath of My Father.

Happy is the one who will dwell in their shelter, for the just hand of God shall not lay hold of him.”

We are not only to receive the mercy of God, but to use it by being merciful to others through our actions, our words, and our prayers; in other words, we are to practice the Corporal and Spiritual Works (Acts) of Mercy.

The Lord wants us to do these works of mercy, because even the strongest faith is of no use without works.

Jesus’ Call to Mercy

“I demand from you deeds of mercy, which are to arise love for Me. You are to show mercy to your neighbors always and everywhere. You must not shrink from this or try to excuse or absolve yourself from it.

I am giving you three ways of exercising mercy toward your neighbor:
the first — by deed, the second — by word, the third — by prayer. In these three degrees is contained the fullness of mercy, and it is an unquestionable proof of love for Me. By this means a soul glorifies and pays reverence to My mercy.

Many souls … are often worried because they do not have the material means with which to carry out an act of mercy. Yet spiritual mercy, which requires neither permissions nor storehouses, is much more meritorious and is within the grasp of every soul.

If a soul does not exercise mercy somehow or other, it will not obtain My mercy on the day of judgment. Oh, if only souls knew how to gather eternal treasure for themselves, they would not be judged, for they would forestall My judgment with their mercy” (1317).

What are the Works of Mercy?

  • Feed the hungry
  • Give drink to the thirsty
  • Clothe the naked
  • Shelter the homeless
  • Comfort the prisoners
  • Visit the sick
  • Bury the dead
  • Teach the ignorant
  • Pray for the living & dead
  • Correct sinners
  • Counsel those in doubt
  • Console the sorrowful
  • Bear wrongs patiently
  • Forgive wrongs willingly

How to Pray the Divine Mercy Chaplet

  1. Begin with the Sign of the Cross, Recite One (1) Our Father, Recite One (1) Hail Mary and Recite One (1) The Apostles Creed.

  2. Then on the large beads on a Rosary – (Our Father Beads) say the following: Eternal Father, I offer You the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your dearly beloved Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world
  3. On the smaller beads (10 Hail Mary Beads) say the following:  For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.  (Repeat step 2 and 3 for all five decades).
  4. Conclude with (three times):
    Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

Prayer for Mercy

Oh My Jesus – Forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of Hell, and lead all souls to Heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

The Chaplet of the Divine Mercy as a Novena

The Lord told me to say this chaplet for nine days before the Feast of Mercy. It is to begin on Good Friday. By this novena, I will grant every possible grace to souls. (Diary, 796)

Novena to The Divine Mercy which Jesus instructed me to write down and make before the Feast of Mercy. It begins on Good Friday.
“I desire that during these nine days you bring souls to the fount of My mercy, that they may draw therefrom strength and refreshment and whatever graces they need in the hardships of life and, especially, at the hour of death.

  On each day you will bring to My Heart a different group of souls, and you will immerse them in this ocean of My mercy, and I will bring all these souls into the house of My Father. You will do this in this life and in the next. I will deny nothing to any soul whom you will bring to the fount of My mercy.

On each day you will beg My Father, on the strength of My bitter Passion, for graces for these souls.”

  • First Day: Today, bring to Me all mankind, especially all sinners, and immerse them in the ocean of My mercy. In this way you will console Me in the bitter grief into which the loss of souls plunges Me. (1210)
  • Second Day: Today bring to Me the souls of priests and religious, and immerse them in My unfathomable mercy. It was they who gave Me the strength to endure My bitter Passion. Through them, as through channels, My mercy flows out upon mankind. (1212)
  • Third Day: Today bring to Me all devout and faithful souls, and immerse them in the ocean of My mercy. These souls brought Me consolation on the Way of the Cross. They were that drop of consolation in the midst of an ocean of bitterness. (1214)
  • Fourth Day: Today bring to Me the pagans and those who do not yet know me. I was thinking also of them during My bitter Passion, and their future zeal comforted My Heart. Immerse them in the ocean of My mercy. (1216)
  • Fifth Day: Today bring to Me the souls of heretics and schismatic, and immerse them in the ocean of My mercy. During My bitter Passion they tore at My Body and Heart; that is, My Church. As they return to unity with the Church, My wounds heal, and in this way they alleviate My Passion. (1218)
  • Sixth Day: Today bring to Me the meek and humble souls and the souls of little children, and immerse them in My mercy. These souls most closely resemble My Heart. They strengthened Me during My bitter agony. I saw them as earthly Angels, who would keep vigil at My altars. I pour out upon them whole torrents of grace. Only the humble soul is able to receive My grace. I favor humble souls with My confidence. (1220)
  • Seventh Day: Today bring to Me the souls who especially venerate and glorify My mercy, and immerse them in My mercy. These souls sorrowed most over My Passion and entered most deeply into My Spirit. They are living images of My Compassionate Heart. These souls will shine with a special brightness in the next life. Not one of them will go into the fire of hell. I shall particularly defend each one of them at the hour of death. (1224)
  • Eighth Day: Today bring to Me the souls who are in the prison of Purgatory, and immerse them in the abyss of My mercy. Let the torrents of My Blood cool down their scorching flames. All these souls are greatly loved by Me. They are making retribution to My justice. It is in your power to bring them relief. Draw all the indulgences from the treasury of My Church and offer them on their behalf. Oh, if you only knew the torments they suffer, you would continually offer for them the alms of the spirit and pay off their debt to My justice. (1226)
  • Ninth Day: Today bring to Me souls who have become lukewarm, and immerse them in the abyss of My mercy. These souls wound My Heart most painfully. My soul suffered the most dreadful loathing in the Garden of Olives because of lukewarm souls. They were the reason I cried out: “Father, take this cup away from Me, if it be Your will.” For them, the last hope of salvation is to flee to My mercy. (1228)

What is the Divine Mercy?

In 1933, God gave Sister Faustina a striking vision of His Mercy, Sister tells us:
“I saw a great light, with God the Father in the midst of it. Between this light and the earth I saw Jesus nailed to the Cross and in such a way that God, wanting to look upon the earth, had to look through Our Lord’s wounds and I understood that God blessed the earth for the sake of Jesus.”

Of another vision on Sept. 13, 1935, she writes:

“I saw an Angel, the executor of God’s wrath… about to strike the earth…I began to beg God earnestly for the world with words which I heard interiorly. As I prayed in this way, I saw the Angel’s helplessness, and he could not carry out the just punishment….”

The following day an inner voice taught her to say this prayer on ordinary rosary beads:

“First say one ‘Our Father’, ‘Hail Mary’, and ‘I believe’.

Then on the large beads say the following words:
‘Eternal Father, I offer You the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your dearly beloved Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.’

On the smaller beads you are to say the following words:
‘For the sake of His sorrowful Passion have mercy on us and on the whole world.’

In conclusion you are to say these words three times:
‘Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world’.

Jesus said later to Sister Faustina:

“Say unceasingly this chaplet that I have taught you. Anyone who says it will receive great Mercy at the hour of death. Priests will recommend it to sinners as the last hope.

Even the most hardened sinner, if he recites this Chaplet even once, will receive grace from My Infinite Mercy. I want the whole world to know My Infinite Mercy.

I want to give unimaginable graces to
those who trust in My Mercy….”

“….When they say this Chaplet in the presence of the dying, I will stand between My Father and the dying person not as the just judge but as the Merciful Savior”.
Christ died so that you might live

Источник: https://indefenseofthecross.com/divine-mercy/

13 Good Prayers for Traveling Mercies

Prayer For All Who Show God’s Mercy

Traveling mercies look to the Lord for a safe and smooth travel. From a time in the late nineteenth century when travel was difficult, traveling mercies with travel with those that were heading to their ministry destination. If you are embarking on a similar state of travel, here are some good prayers for traveling mercies.

Prayer #1

In the name of God I go on this journey. May God the Father be with me, God the Son protect me, and God the Holy Ghost be by my side. Amen.

Prayer #2

Lord, be our guide and our protector on the journey we are about to take. Watch over us. Protect us from accidents. Keep us free from harm to body and soul. Lord, support us with Your grace when we are tired. Help us be patient in any trouble which may come our way. Keep us always mindful of Your presence and love.

Amen.

Prayer #13

O God, Who brought our fathers through the Red Sea and carried them safely through the deep as they sang praises of Thy name, we humbly beseech Thee to guard Thy servants aboard ship, and having repelled all adversities, bring them to the desired port after a calm voyage. Through our Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who livest and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, world without end.

Amen.

Whether you are traveling close to home or long distance overseas, here is the perfect prayer for traveling. It is important to keep in mind as Christians, that there is no road you ever travel alone. This prayer will help to bring you comfort and peace during your journey.

About the Author of this Blog Post
Crystal Ayres has served as our editor-in-chief for the last five years. She is a proud veteran, wife and mother. The goal of ConnectUs is to publish compelling content that addresses some of the biggest issues the world faces. If you would to reach out to contact Crystal, then go here to send her a message

Источник: https://connectusfund.org/13-good-prayers-for-traveling-mercies

Have Mercy on Me: Four Glimpses into the Heart of God

Prayer For All Who Show God’s Mercy

The mercy of God is one of the most precious realities in the world, one of the most revealing themes in all the Bible, and one of the most tragically misunderstood truths about God.

If you want to know who God really is, if you want to peek into his heart, it is not the display of his just wrath and cosmic power to which you should look.

Rather, set your eye on his mercy, without minimizing the fullness of his might, and take in the life-changing panorama.

Many of us today are prone, by nature and nurture, to see God’s mercy as peripheral or incidental to who he is. We suspect that perhaps he shows mercy by accident or weakness.

But if we let the Scriptures have their say, we will see that when God shows his mercy, he does so with utter intentionality and strength, and we as his creatures get our deepest glimpse of who he is not just in his sovereignty but his goodness.

Not simply in his greatness but his gentleness. Not only in his towering might but also in his surprising tenderness.

“God does not show mercy by accident or weakness, but always with utter intentionality and strength.” But God’s mercy not only shows us who he is, but also tells us something essential about ourselves.

That we have been shown mercy means not only that we didn’t deserve his favor, but that we deserved his righteous hammer against the anvil of justice. Our cry for mercy admits to our ill-deserving, not just undeserving.

By rights, we should be under his impending wrath, all mankind (Ephesians 2:3) — but for the “the tender mercy of our God” (Luke 1:78).

But we are not the first to peer into his heart and catch a glimpse of his fatherly posture toward us. God has made the world to turn again and again on fresh revelations of his mercy.

Moses Saw Mercy

The first great glimpse of God’s mercy came to Moses. In one of the most important passages in all the Bible, after Moses has asked God to show him his glory, God answers, “I will make all my goodness pass before you and will proclaim before you my name ‘The Lord.’ And I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy” (Exodus 33:19).

When asked to show his glory, God puts his goodness in grace and mercy on display — and his utter freedom in showing his mercy to whomever he chooses.

Israel may not be all that more righteous than Pharaoh and the Egyptians, but God’s mercy on Israel is not Israel’s efforts and earning.

Rather, God, as God, is utterly free to show mercy to whom he will — and he has chosen to be merciful to his people.

Just a few verses later, as he passes Moses by, God proclaims,

“The Lord, the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation.” (Exodus 34:6–7)

God is not unjust; by no means will he clear the guilty and sweep sin under the rug. But the leading revelation of his glory is his mercy. The first and greatest truth for his people to know about him is he is “a God merciful and gracious.” His grace and mercy shine as the apex of his glory.

He is “slow to anger” — he will show wrath, and justly so. It would be unloving to his people if he did not get angry when they were threatened and assaulted. And yet even in such justice, he is slow to anger. Wrath is his righteous response to evil, but it is not his heart.

Justice is the stem; mercy is the flower.

David Fell on Mercy

Moses’s glimpse of the merciful God rightly became the leading revelation in Israel.

It would be remembered, even as his people turned their backs to him, “the Lord your God is gracious and merciful and will not turn away his face from you, if you return to him” (2 Chronicles 30:9).

The prophets celebrated him as “gracious and merciful” (Isaiah 30:18; Joel 2:13; Jonah 4:2), but the Psalms in particular basked in his mercy (see Psalm 86:5; 103:8; 111:4; 116:5; and 145:8–9, among others).

It should be no surprise, then, that Israel’s great psalmist-king, David, would cast himself utterly on the mercy of God. He began his great song of confession, Psalm 51, “Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love; according to your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions” (Psalm 51:1).
“Wrath is God’s righteous response to evil, but it is not his heart. Justice is the stem; mercy is the flower.”

Later, when David recognized his sin against God by numbering the people, the prophet Gad gave him three options for God’s discipline: “Shall three years of famine come to you in your land? Or will you flee three months before your foes while they pursue you? Or shall there be three days’ pestilence in your land?” (2 Samuel 24:13). David had glimpsed the heart of God, and he knew where to fall: “Let us fall into the hand of the Lord, for his mercy is great; but let me not fall into the hand of man” (2 Samuel 24:14).

Jeremiah Wept for Mercy

In the generations after David, Israel fell into a spiral of moral decline. Eventually came the bleak moment Moses had foreseen as inevitable in the hard and wandering hearts of the people.

In 587 BC the Babylonians besieged, conquered, and decimated Jerusalem. It was the most tragic and horrific moment in all the Old Testament.

The city was so famished and desperate that women boiled and ate their own babies (Lamentations 4:10).

Into these blackest of times, the prophet Jeremiah penned the darkest and most despairing verses in all the Bible: the book of Lamentations. Chapter 3 is the heart of his lament, where the pain is most exposed, and hope seems almost lost. Yet even here, faith shines forth as the prophet gets a glimpse into the heart of God through his mercy.

Remember my affliction and my wanderings, the wormwood and the gall! My soul continually remembers it and is bowed down within me.

 But this I call to mind, and therefore I have hope: The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.

“The Lord is my portion,” says my soul, “therefore I will hope in him.” (Lamentations 3:19–24)

In the very time and the very place where God’s people would be most tempted to abandon hope, the prophet points to the mercies of God, never ceasing and new every day.

Paul Marveled at Mercy

Then, in the fullness of time, God sent his own Son not simply to dispense his mercy, but to embody it. Jesus is the Mercy of God made human. He didn’t just teach his people to echo God’s mercy in their lives (Matthew 5:7; 18:33; Luke 6:36; Luke 10:37), but he himself was, and is, the mercy of God to us.

Fittingly, the most prominent request made of Jesus in the Gospels is, “Have mercy on me!” (Matthew 9:27; 15:22; 17:15; 20:30–31; Mark 10:47–48; Luke 16:24; 17:13; 18:13, 38–39), which is precisely what he did in his perfect life, sacrificial death, and triumphant resurrection — extending God’s mercy not just to Israel, but to all the nations by faith.

The apostle Paul, who received his ministry because of God’s mercy (1 Corinthians 7:25; 2 Corinthians 4:1; 1 Timothy 1:13, 16), became the instrument of the decisive revelation.

What Moses first saw, and David fell on, and Jeremiah wept for, Paul saw on the other side of Christ, and he marveled. In all the Bible, Paul gives us the clearest vantage into, as Romans 9:16 says, the God “who has mercy” — literally, the mercy-having God.

In other words, God’s mercy expresses his heart, as Paul will show, in a way that the demonstration of his wrath and the display of his power do not.

Romans 9:22–23 gives us the deepest glimpse into God’s heart, and what we find at bottom is mercy. This is perhaps as deep as the Bible goes in explaining to us why God governs his creation as he does. Paul puts it in the form of a question, not because he’s unsure of the truth, but for rhetorical effect, because it is awesome and sobering to contemplate.

What if God, desiring to show his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience vessels of wrath prepared for destruction, in order to make known the riches of his glory for vessels of mercy, which he has prepared beforehand for glory?

“Our God is not just powerful. He is not simply a God of uncompromising justice. He is the mercy-having God.”

Make no mistake, God does make known his omnipotence. And he does show his righteous wrath. He is holy. To not demonstrate wrath in a world of sin and rebellion against him would be untrue to himself and unloving to his people.

God is phenomenally powerful, beyond our human capacity to comprehend it. And such an almighty God does indeed show wrath at the trampling of his glory and the harming of his people. But wrath is not his heart.

Severity in God always serves his heart of mercy — to make known the riches of his glory to his people, who are the vessels of his mercy.

Entrust Yourself to Mercy

Our God is not simply sovereign, wonderful as it is to celebrate. And he is not only a God of uncompromising justice, thankful as we are that he is. He is the mercy-having God who invites us to look not only at his awesome authority and sovereign strength, but to set our eyes on his mercy and see into his very heart.

Entrust yourself to the God who has mercy.

Источник: https://www.desiringgod.org/articles/have-mercy-on-me

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